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I would like to use WebKit's box-shadow css property for a little drop-down. The code would look like:

.drop_down{
  -webkit-box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
  box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
}

However, for browsers that do not have this capability, I would like to use borders to approximate this drop shadow, like so:

.drop_down{
  border-top: 1px solid #bbb;
  border-left: 1px solid #bbb;
  border-right: 2px solid #bbb;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #bbb;
}

The problem is, I don't want the border-based shadow to show up for the browsers that DO support box-shadow. I would like to avoid browser sniffing because I assume it's hard to cover all the cases. What is the simplest way to do this? I prefer a javascript-less solution, but I will consider simple javascript-based ones too.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Modernizr does feature detection. Code would be:

.drop_down{
  border-top: 1px solid #bbb;
  border-left: 1px solid #bbb;
  border-right: 2px solid #bbb;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #bbb;
}
.boxshadow .drop_down{
  border: 0px none;
  -webkit-box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
  box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
}

You need to include the modernizr javascript library for this to work.

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Modernizr is a nice library. It allows you do conditional css in a clean way. –  airportyh Jul 2 '10 at 1:23
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This will not cover all scenarios, and I think it fails in Opera, but I would do this:

.drop_down{
  -webkit-box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
  -moz-box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
  box-shadow: 1px 1px 4px #888;
  border: solid 1px #bbb;
  border: solid 0px rgba(0,0,0,0); /* Ignored by browsers that don't support it */
}

Test Results

Apparently rgba was introduced in Firefox 3.0, but -moz-box-shadow was introduced in 3.5. So, Firefox 3.0 fails the test. Here are where we stand so far:

Test Page

  • Firefox 2.0 -- Pass (Grey 1px line)
  • Firefox 3.0 -- Fail
  • Firefox 3.5 -- Pass (Shadow)
  • Internet Explorer 6.0 -- Pass (Grey 1px line)
  • Internet Explorer 7.0 -- Pass (Grey 1px line)
  • Internet Explorer 8.0 -- Pass (Grey 1px line)
  • Safari 3.0 -- Pass (Shadow)
  • Safari 4.0 -- Pass (Shadow)
  • Chrome 3.0 -- Pass (Shadow)
  • Opera 10 -- Fail
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are the browsers that do not support rgba the same ones that do not support shadows ? –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jan 11 '10 at 20:59
1  
@Gaby I know those that support box shadow support rgba, but I am not positive it is the other way around... trying to run some tests. –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 21:07
    
Great work here. But I guess haven't found a good solution yet. –  airportyh Jan 12 '10 at 16:50
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Building off what Gaby said, not only is there not a good way to accomplish that, but it's against the idea of Progressive Enhancement.

Here's a few reasons to consider not doing what you're proposing:

  1. Those borders will add width to your element in any browser that has a proper box model. That could cause problems like floated elements being bumped onto new lines if you don't plan for the added width.
  2. Progressive enhancement is about building up in an additive manner. Creating "alternative" conditional styles is inviting headaches for maintenance.
  3. If you choose appealing border styles, they may actually look better when shadowed. I've found that to be true in a number of projects. The shadow really makes the border stand out in an appealing way.

Hopefully that helps.

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It seems that what you suggesting is building to the lowest common denominator. I think what he is doing is perfectly acceptable: use the nice stuff for browsers that support it, use an alternative that is somewhat nice for other browsers. Your width point is valid, but easily accounted for. –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 21:49
    
He asked about Progressive Enhancement, which is a specific philosophy/paradigm in web design. It's not about the lowest common denominator; it's about starting from the most basic level of functionality and progressively layering on visual or functional enhancements in non-destructive ways so that all browsers are supported, but the newest ones get the shiniest toys. Check out the ALA article for a very good review of what Progressive Enhancement is: alistapart.com/articles/understandingprogressiveenhancement –  Gabriel Hurley Jan 11 '10 at 22:20
    
Gabriel: I agree with most of what you said, but I disagree that conditional styles is against the very idea of progressive enhancement. Conditional behavior and styles is what a lot of Javascript libraries do. jQuery in particular is big on testing features and conditionally doing different things depending. I think this particular problem speaks more to the weakness of CSS. For example, if we could test for whether a property is supported and apply a different style if it was not - in a standard way, I think that would solve a large class of problems, without the headaches. –  airportyh Jan 12 '10 at 17:31
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No easy way to do it without using specific tricks for each browser ...

either IE conditional comments (because i think only the IEs do not support some version of the box-shadow now..) or css hacks..

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I actually didn't realize FF supports it now too. I think I'll just target IE differently then. Thanks. –  airportyh Jan 11 '10 at 21:16
1  
The problem is only 3.5+ of FF supports shadow, so previous versions + Opera + IE all don't support shadow. –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 21:18
    
Indeed Doug ... my mistake .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jan 11 '10 at 22:29
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