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I don't know if this is possible, but in some of my unit tests, I end up initializing different objects with the same arguments. I would like to be able to store those arguments in some variable and just initialize the multi-parameter object constructor with that variable so instead of doing:

Thing thing1 = new Thing(arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
Thing thing2 = new Thing(arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
Thing thing3 = new Thing(arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);

I could do the following:

MagicalArgumentsContainer args = (arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
Thing thing1 = new Thing(args);
Thing thing2 = new Thing(args);
Thing thing3 = new Thing(args);

Is there any way of doing this without overriding Thing's constructor to take a list that it manually explodes and plucks arguments out of? Maybe some C# syntactic sugar?

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1  
No, you want to use Ruby =). –  Ed S. Jan 11 '10 at 21:16
2  
Python's argument unpacking is a blessing! –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 11 '10 at 21:18
1  
I did think to myself that, were I using Ruby on this project, I wouldn't have had to ask this question. –  Sarah Vessels Jan 11 '10 at 21:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I mean, there's this:

Func<Thing> f = () => new Thing(arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
Thing thing1 = f();
Thing thing2 = f();
Thing thing3 = f();
Thing thing4 = f();

Just be careful of closure semantics.

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1  
yeah, thats like an InLine tiny ObjectFactory, but take in consideration that if arg1-arg4 are reference types, then all your things will share those objects, if they are value type or you dont care if they are shared, then thats probably the easiest –  Francisco Noriega Jan 11 '10 at 21:55
    
In my case, arg1-4 are strings, so it's all good. –  Sarah Vessels Jan 12 '10 at 15:00

Well I guess you could use an IoC container, since several of this also offer an ObjectFactory, ie you tell the IoC how to make a new instance of type T and then you just ask the IoC to give you an instance of it.

However if you dont want to get an IoC, you could make yourself a little factory class

public MagicFactory
{
   T arg1, T2 arg2,  T3 arg3,.., TN argN;

   public MagicFactory(T1 a1,..., TN aN)
   {
      this.arg1=a1;
       ...
      this.argN = an;
   }

   public Thing GimmeDaThing()
   {
      return new Thing(this.arg1,...,this.argN);
   }
}

however keep in mind that if the arguments are not of value type, then all your instances of Thing will have references to the same objects, so, even though you have different instance of Things, they all would point to the same arg1. What you could do to fix that is to actually take in a Func in the parameter, so you can actually create a new one:

public MagicFactory
{
   Func<T1> arg1, ,.., Func<TN> argN;

   public MagicFactory(Func<T1> a1,..., Func<TN> aN)
   {
      this.arg1=a1;
       ...
      this.argN = an;
   }

   public Thing GimmeDaThing()
   {
      return new Thing(this.arg1(),...,this.argN());
   }
}

and you would call it like this:

var magicContainer = new MagicFactory(()=> new T1(...),..., ()=>new T2(..);


var thing1 = magicContainer.GimmeDaThing();
var thing1 = magicContainer.GimmeDaThing();
var thing1 = magicContainer.GimmeDaThing();
var thing1 = magicContainer.GimmeDaThing();

and you would get a fresh instance of Thing each time, each with their own property objects.

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1  
public MagicFactory<t> ? –  gingerbreadboy Jan 11 '10 at 23:19

There's also this, assuming your Thing1 is a trivial object, and you just need a shallow copy:

Thing thing1 = new Thing(arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4);
Thing thing2 = (Thing)thing1.MemberwiseClone();
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You could maybe rewrite GimmieAThing to something like GimmieAThing<T> using a bit of generics?

public class MagicalArgumentsContainer
    {
            object[] _myParams;

            public MagicalArgumentsContainer (params object[] myParams)
            {
            _myParams = myParams;
            }

            public Thing GimmieAThing()
            {
    return new Thing(_myParams[0], _myParams[1], _myParams[2], _myParams[3]);
        }
    }
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I'd suggest looking into the Test Data Builder pattern. It works really well when you have many parameters you wish to vary independently, re-use and so on.

You can use properties + object initializers for 'flat' classes, or fluid method chaining as an alternative. I've toyed with both and each has its advantages.

Benefits:

  • You can capture the variables/values that were used to construct an object
  • You can re-use a builder instance if the values it takes are simple types and/or immutable (value types, strings etc.)
  • You can vary each ctor parameter independently without noise / code duplication It makes the tests read really nicely as, instead of having to remember which ctor param is which, you see the name.

If you need to create new instances of each parameter, check out bangoker's answer.

Anyway, here's some code:

public class ThingBuilder
{
   // set up defaults so that we don't need to set them unless required
   private string m_bongoName = "some name";
   private DateTime m_dateTime = new DateTime(2001, 1, 1);
   private int m_anotherArg = 5;
   private bool m_isThisIsGettingTedious = true;

   public ThingBuilder BongoName(string bongoName)
   {
      m_bongoName = bongoName;
      return this;
   }

   public ThingBuilder DateTime(DateTime dateTime)
   {
      m_dateTime = dateTime;
      return this;     
   }

   // etc. for properties 3...N

   public Thing Build()
   {    
      return new Thing(m_bongoName, m_dateTime, m_anotherArg, m_isThisGettingTedious);
   }
}

Usage (once instance):

// notice that the parameters are now explicitly named + readable!
Thingy builtInstance = new ThingBuilder()
                           .BongoName("um bongo")
                           .DateTime(DateTime.Now)
                           .GettingTedious(true)
                           .Build();

Multiple Instances:

var builder = new ThingBuilder()
                  .BongoName("um bongo")
                  .DateTime(DateTime.Now)
                  .GettingTedious(true);

// let's make multiple objects
Thing builtThing = builder.Build();
Thing anotherBuiltThing = builder.Build();
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Use the params declaration in your method like so:

public Thing(params string[] args)
{
    foreach(string s in args)
    {
        ...
    }
}

and it will allow you to do the following:

result = Things(arg1)
result = Things(arg1,arg2)
result = Things(arg1,arg2,arg3)
result = Things(arg1,arg2,arg3,arg4)
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You could also use an array of objects and a for loop if you need to do this many times.

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