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How can I get the Unicode code point for a character? Here is what I have tried, but it is not printing the same character, Am I properley understanding how unicode works?

How can I get the value of a unicode character?

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
char *a = "ā";
int n;
while(a[n] != '\0')
{
    printf("%x", a[n]);
    n+=1;
}
printf("\n \uC481");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The output of your code will heavily depend on how the single non-ASCII character 'ā' gets stored in your code: extended ASCII as per your local editor's code page, as UTF-8 (which cannot be stored into a single char, or as 16-bit Unicode (which most compilers can't compile and also cannot be stored in a char). – Jongware Dec 8 '13 at 15:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the first place, there are few corrections in your code.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
char *a = "ā";
int n = 0; //Initialize n with zero.
while(a[n] != '\0')
{
    printf("%x", a[n]);
    n+=1;
}
//\u will not work. To print hexadecimal value, use \x
printf("\n %X\n\", 0xC481);
return 0;
}

Here, you are trying to print hex value of each byte. This will be not a Unicode value of character beyond 0xff.

unsigned short is the most common data structure used to store Unicode value although it cannot store all the code points. If you need to store all the Unicode points as it is, then use int which must be 32-bit.

Unicode value of a character is numeric value of each character when it is represented in UTF-32. Otherwise, you will have to compute from the byte sequence if encoding is UTF-8 or UTF-16.

share|improve this answer
1  
int is only required to be at least 16 bits. unsigned long or uint32_t is probably better. wchar_t is more likely to be able to gold a Unicode code point, though it's typically 16 bits on Windows systems. – Keith Thompson Dec 8 '13 at 4:33

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