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How the following two are differ:

>>> s = 'string'
>>> tuple(s)
('s', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g')
>>> tuple([s])
('string',)
>>> tuple((s))
('s', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g')
>>> tuple((s,))
('string',)
>>>    

String is an iterable object thats why it split into multiple element inside the tuple ?

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1  
in case it's confusing to any readers, semantically (s) is exactly the same as s. The comma is what makes the inner argument to your last example (s,) a tuple, not the enclosing parentheses. Or perhaps you could alternately say the parentheses are necessary but not sufficient. :) –  roippi Dec 8 '13 at 6:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Tuples are not determined by parenthesis, they are determined by the comma:

>>> (1)
1
>>> (1,)
(1,)
>>> (1),
(1,)
>>> 1
1
>>> 1,
(1,)

The intermediate parenthesis are removed until an expression is determined:

>>> tuple((((('string')))))
('s', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g')
>>> tuple((((('string'))),))
('string',)
>>> tuple((((('string'),)),))
(('string',),)

You see how Python parses these expressions by using ast

>>> import ast
>>> ast.literal_eval("((((('string')))))")
'string'
>>> ast.literal_eval("((((('string')))),)")
('string',)

And shows you why tuple(('string')) is the same as tuple('string'). The extra parenthesis do not create a tuple and are just discarded by the parser.

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Yes. list expects its parameter to be

may be either a sequence, a container that supports iteration, or an iterator object.

So, it creates individual strings for each and every character in the string and returns the list. When you enclose it with [] or (,), you are creating a list of strings or tuple of strings. So, each element of that is taken and a new list is prepared.

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Thanks for the clarification. –  sapam Dec 8 '13 at 6:02
    
@yopy You are welcome :) –  thefourtheye Dec 8 '13 at 6:03

If you call tuple on a string, or any iterable it will do the same thing that calling list on a string would do: Loop through the "least deep" (1st dimension) part of the iterable. Take these examples:

>>> s = 'string'
>>> tuple(s)
('s', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g')
>>> tuple([s])
('string',)
>>>
>>> tuple((x for x in [s]))
('string',)

In the first example, the 1st dimension in s is the string 'string', so tuple takes each value from s. In the second example, the 1st dimension is the list s, which contains the variable s. In this case, the variable itself is the 1st dimension, so the entire string is tupled. This is proven in the final generator case as well.

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