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If I have a generic interface with a couple of implementing classes such as:

public interface IDataElement<T>
{
    int DataElement { get; set; }
    T Value { get; set; }
}

public class IntegerDataElement : IDataElement<int>
{
    public int DataElement { get; set; }
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

public class StringDataElement : IDataElement<String>
{
    public int DataElement { get; set; }
    public String Value { get; set; }
}

Is it possible to pass a collection of the implementing classes of differing types, without having to resort to passing as object.

It does not appear to be possible to define a return values as

public IDataElement<T>[] GetData()

or

public IDataElement<object>[] GetData() 

Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can certainly declare:

public IDataElement<T>[] GetData<T>()

and

public IDataElement<object>[] GetData()
  • although the latter probably isn't what you're after (your interface won't be variant even in C# 4 as it uses T in both an input and an output position; even if it were variant, you wouldn't be able to use that variance for value types). The former will require the caller to specify <T>, e.g.

    foo.GetData<string>();

Is that okay for you?

There's no way of expressing "a collection of object, each of which implements IDataElement<T> for a different T" unless you also give it a nongeneric base class, at which you could just use IList<IDataElement>. In this case the nongeneric IDataElement could have the DataElement property, leaving the Value property in the generic interface:

public interface IDataElement
{
    int DataElement { get; set; }
}

public interface IDataElement<T> : IDataElement
{
    T Value { get; set; }
}

Is that useful in your particular situation?

It's not clear how you'd want to use a collection of data elements without knowing their types... if the above doesn't help you, maybe you could say more about what you expected to do with the collections.

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I had tried the non-generic base class but it loses the detail of the Value property –  benPearce Jan 11 '10 at 21:40
    
@benPearce: But you can't use that anyway, because you don't know the type involved. Please try to show how you'd use the code, and then we can advise you better. –  Jon Skeet Jan 11 '10 at 21:50
    
I ended up going down the Non-generic base interface, with object GetValue() and SetValue(object) methods. Working so far –  benPearce Jan 15 '10 at 7:10
    
@JonSkeet, where would I be able to find a reason why covariance is not supported for structs? There is good reason, but can't come up with one for now :( –  Chris Eelmaa Nov 10 '13 at 14:24
1  

No you can't do this - the only options are to either use a non-generic interface:

public interface IDataElement
{
    int DataElement { get; set; }
    object Value { get; set; }
}

Alternatively create a wrapper and pass that to methods that know the types they require:

public class DataElementBag
{
    private IDictionary<Type, List<object>> _elements;
    ...
    public void Add<T>(IDataElement<T> de)
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if(!this._elements.ContainsKey(t))
        {
            this._elements[t] = new List<object>();
        }

        this._elements[t].Add(de);
    }

    public void IEnumerable<IDataElement<T>> GetElementsByType<T>()
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        return this._elements.ContainsKey(t)
            ? this._elements[t].Cast<IDataElement<T>>()
            : Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    }
}
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