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I've noticed that a non-static class can have a static constructor:

public class Thing
{
    public Thing()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("non-static");
    }

    static Thing()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("static");
    }
}

And when you initialize an instance of Thing the static constructor gets called first.

Output:

static

non-static

What would be the need for this? Do you use it to initialize static fields on your instance of the non-static type?

Are there any things to take into consideration when using a static constructor?

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4  
You answer it yourself to initialize static fields. Read more on static constructor here. –  Rohit Vats Dec 8 '13 at 8:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Do you use it to initialize static fields on your instance of the non-static type?

Pretty much, except that static fields (or static members of any kind) aren't associated with instances; they are associated with the type itself, regardless of whether it is a static class or a non-static class.

The documentation lists some properties of static constructors, one of which is:

  • A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

Here, "before" means "immediately before", and whichever one of those things happens first. This is because a static constructor is only called once per type in a single program execution.


Are there any things to take into consideration when using a static constructor?

Here's the full list as given by the link above, which should give you an idea of what to expect when using a static constructor:

  • A static constructor does not take access modifiers or have parameters.

  • A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

  • A static constructor cannot be called directly.

  • The user has no control on when the static constructor is executed in the program.

  • A typical use of static constructors is when the class is using a log file and the constructor is used to write entries to this file.

  • Static constructors are also useful when creating wrapper classes for unmanaged code, when the constructor can call the LoadLibrary method.

  • If a static constructor throws an exception, the runtime will not invoke it a second time, and the type will remain uninitialized for the lifetime of the application domain in which your program is running.

Besides making sure you don't try to access non-static members, since you're not in an instance constructor, the other main thing you have to consider is that a static constructor is always called at a specific time during program execution. As stated, you cannot control this, other than by controlling when "the first instance is created or any static members are referenced."

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As stated by BoltClock's a Unicorn above.

But a nice addition is that you can use it to implement a Singleton nice and easily too:

public sealed class Singleton
{
   private static readonly Singleton instance;

   private Singleton() { }

   static Singleton()
   {
      instance = new Singleton()
   }

   public static Singleton Instance
   {
      get 
      {
         return instance; 
      }
   }
}

More details can be found at http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/90896/Singletons-in-C-Static-Constructor-vs-Static-Initi

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This isn't using a static constructor... –  Servy Dec 12 '13 at 15:26
    
Edited to include the correct code and link. Apologies. –  pb. Dec 17 '13 at 10:26
    
But there's no reason to use the static constructor here; your earlier code is generally preferable to this, making this a poor reason to use a static constructor. –  Servy Dec 17 '13 at 14:56
    
In this case I agree and this might be overkill but imagine that Singleton has other properties that need to be added to it, these would all be set in the static constructor along with any other dependencies. However, this method of producing a singleton is entirely thread safe since static constructors are guaranteed to run once per app domain and before any instances of a class are created. Therefore this is a simple non-locking way of producing a singleton. –  pb. Dec 18 '13 at 10:37
    
It's very rare for field initializers to be insufficient for initializing static fields. As is the case here, from your first example, a static field initializer is shorter, simpler, and equally functional. –  Servy Dec 18 '13 at 13:48

From MSDN Link:

A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

As you stated it is used to initialize static fields. You only need to consider one thing, non-static fields are not initialized until you create instance of class.

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This is a subjective answer from personal experience, but you can also use it to ensure the initialization of other static variables outside your class, which members of your class may depend on.

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You use it to initialize or invoke static members of your class.

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