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We now to find the directory of a shell script using dirname and $0, but this doesn't work when the script is inluded in another script.

Suppose two files first.sh and second.sh:

/tmp/first.sh :

#!/bin/sh
. "/tmp/test/second.sh"

/tmp/test/second.sh :

#!/bin/sh
echo $0

by running first.sh the second script also prints first.sh. How the code in second.sh can find the directory of itself? (Searching for a solution that works on bash/csh/zsh)

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I don't think this is possible. –  janos Dec 8 '13 at 9:10
1  
@janos: No, janos, it is possible, see my answer –  Igor Chubin Dec 8 '13 at 9:16
    
@IgorChubin Awesome! I left that comment so somebody will ping me back ;-) –  janos Dec 8 '13 at 9:17
    
@janos: Of course! –  Igor Chubin Dec 8 '13 at 9:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are no solution that will work equally good in all flavours of shells.

In bash you can use BASH_SOURCE:

$(dirname "$BASH_SOURCE")

Example:

$ cat /tmp/1.sh
. /tmp/sub/2.sh
$ cat /tmp/sub/2.sh
echo $BASH_SOURCE
$ bash /tmp/1.sh 
/tmp/sub/2.sh

As you can see, the script prints the name of 2.sh, although you start /tmp/1.sh, that includes 2.sh with the source command.

I must note, that this solution will work only in bash. In Bourne-shell (/bin/sh) it is impossible.

In csh/tcsh/zsh you can use $_ instead of BASH_SOURCE.

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2  
This is bash specific. I mentioned in question that I searching for a solution that works on bash/csh/zsh –  Taha Jahangir Dec 8 '13 at 9:18
    
And note that I used /bin/sh as interpreter –  Taha Jahangir Dec 8 '13 at 9:20
    
I've note in the answer that it will only work in bash. In bourne-shell it is impossible. –  Igor Chubin Dec 8 '13 at 9:20
1  
@TahaJahangir: You have written that you look for solution for tcsh/zsh/bash; I've provided you with it. My solution will work in bash/tcsh/zsh. –  Igor Chubin Dec 8 '13 at 9:25
    
In bash We can use ${VAR:-DEFAULT} construct to use another variable if $VAR is not defined, but this not works in tsch/zsh. Also $_ not works in sh!. Can you modify you solution to work on csh and bash, or sh? –  Taha Jahangir Dec 8 '13 at 9:33

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