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I created a simple fiddle, to illustrate the differences between scopes (true, false, {}).

But I can't understand, why it's not working as I expect...

1) Why changing the "val" on controller, affects directiveTwo with "scope:true". If I change the value in directive, then controller stops to affect it.

2) Why directiveThree has Isolated scope, but it inherits the values from controller (so value created in directiveOne, passed to it to), changing the value in controller affects the directiveThree. When I change the value from that directive, it affects the controllers value. Shouldn't Isolated scope be Isolated?

Fiddle
HTML:

<div id="myApp" ng-controller="ctrl1">
    Controller: <input ng-model="val"/> <b>{{val}}</b> Child: <b>{{childVal}}</b>
    <br/>
    <div directive-one>
        Directive 1: <input ng-model="val"/> Val: <b>{{val}}</b> Child: <b>{{childVal}}</b>
    </div>
    <div directive-two>
        Directive 2: <input ng-model="val"/> Val: <b>{{val}}</b> Child: <b>{{childVal}}</b>
    </div>
    <div directive-three>
        Directive 3: <input ng-model="val"/> Val: <b>{{val}}</b> Child: <b>{{childVal}}</b>
    </div>
</div>

JavaScript:

angular.module("myApp", [])
.controller("ctrl1", function($scope){
    $scope.val = "CTRL";
})
.directive("directiveOne", function(){
    return {
        controller: function($scope){
            $scope.childVal = 1;
        },
        scope:false //or not defined at all
    };
})
.directive("directiveTwo", function(){
    return {
        controller: function($scope){
            $scope.childVal = 2;
        },
        scope:true
    };
})
.directive("directiveThree", function(){
    return {
        controller: function($scope){
            $scope.childVal = 3;
        },
        scope:{}
    };
});

angular.bootstrap(document.getElementById('myApp'), ["myApp"]);
share|improve this question
    
Maybe Angular is defaulting to transclude: true for your directives? Then val would be available in the directives, and bound to the outermost controller's model, explaining the behaviour you're seeing. –  Joe Dyndale Dec 8 '13 at 11:59
    
Thx, I fixed the fiddle...I don't see that directives are transcluded. –  Alex Dn Dec 8 '13 at 12:05
    
Yeah, I found a fix for the fiddle, and have been playing around a bit. If you move the contents of your directive DIVs into the template for the directives, and use scope: {}you'll get the behavior you're expecting. So Angular likely puts the DIVs' contents into the outer controller scope because it doesn't see it as part of the directive when it's not defined as the directive's template. –  Joe Dyndale Dec 8 '13 at 12:16
    
Doesn't look like Batarang works with JSFiddle, but try using it on that script locally; it will show you which scopes you have and what is placed where. Then play around with the code and see what changes that makes to the scopes. That's probably the best way to figure this stuff out. –  Joe Dyndale Dec 8 '13 at 12:25
    
Yep, with template this works. Didn't knew about the importance of template in this case. But I still don't understand, why in directiveTwo (with scope:true), changing the value on controller affects directive. Only after modifying the value in directive, the controller changes stop to affect directive value. –  Alex Dn Dec 8 '13 at 13:30

1 Answer 1

The reason DirectiveTwo may take changes from the controller, but the controller won't change when DirectiveTwo changes the value (...) is because when is expected to let the child change the value of the parent, the bare values won't work.

What is a bare-value?

angular.module("myApp", [])
.controller("ctrl1", function($scope){
    $scope.val ={
        value = "CTRL"   <--- This way a child will inherit the OBJECT and NOT a COPY
    };
    $scope.val = "CTRL"; <--- This way the child inherits a COPY of the BARE-VALUE
})
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