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I am trying to create a function countElems that takes an Int and a [Int] and returns how many of that specific Int is in the list. So far I have:

countElems :: Int -> [Int] -> Int
countElems n (x:xs)
| xs == []   = 0
| n == x     = 1 + countElems n xs
| n /= x     = countElems n xs

When run, this seems to work, but on further inspection, if you enter countElems 9 [5, 3, 9, 3, 9] the output is 1 instead of 2. I can see this is because it checks that xs == [] before seeing if n == x resulting in the incorrect output, but if I swap those two cases around is says Non-exhaustive pattern.

Edit after further thought:

I could eliminate the error @user2407038 posted with this code:

countElems :: Int -> [Int] -> Int
countElems _ [] = 0
countElems n (x:xs)
| n == x     = 1 + countElems n xs
| n /= x     = countElems n xs

It looks a less elegant but works just the same?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your function is non-exhaustive regardless of which order you place the guards in. Consider countElems 9 []. This is an error since no pattern matches the empty list. (Maybe this is desired behaviour for your case - but typically errors are bad). Consider using pattern matching here:

countElems n (x:xs) = fromEnum (n == x) + countElems n xs
countElems _ []     = 0

The fromEnum avoids if which I like, but you don't have to use it.

There is probably no need to use explicit recursion here. Try \x = length . filter (==x).

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I like this answer as it makes my lecturer wrong, he said we needed two recursive cases but this is a very neat way of solving that problem, thank you! –  benharris Dec 8 '13 at 12:26
5  
@benharris Lecturers are very often "wrong" in the sense that what they teach you is not necessarily what a skilled programmer would write. Real world Haskell code doesn't have very much recursion in it at all. Most of it can be accomplished with library functions instead, which makes the code more readable, easier to maintain, less bug-prone and so on. –  kqr Dec 8 '13 at 13:15

Another one without any recursive clauses:

countElem e = length . filter (e ==)
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In your first check (xs == [] = 0) you forget to check whether x==n in which case the result should be 1 instead of 0:

countElems n (x:xs)
| xs == []   = if x==n then 1 else 0
| n == x     = 1 + countElems n xs
| n /= x     = countElems n xs

Another (probably more straightforward) implementation might look at the list as a whole:

cE n [] = 0
cE n (x:xs) = (if n==x then 1 else 0) + (cE n xs)
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Thank you, the first solution is great. I am quite interested in knowing what the second solution is doing though as I don't think I'm at that level in Haskell yet, what is the cE doing? –  benharris Dec 8 '13 at 12:15
    
@benharris The name cE is just intented to be a short form for countElems. It always "looks" at the first element and only adds one if the first element is the one you are looking for. –  phimuemue Dec 8 '13 at 18:11

You could also write it using map:

countElems :: Int -> [Int] -> Int
countElems n xs = sum $ map (fromEnum . (==n)) xs
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