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My system has 3 active network interfaces:

  • 192.168.1.7 (Wireless adapter)
  • 192.168.247.1 (virtual VMWare Ethernet adapter)
  • 169.254.54.231 (another VMWare Ethernet adapter)

I'm trying to set up an UDP socket listening for SSDP broadcasts on port 1900 on all interfaces, however I don't seem to receive all broadcast datagrams but only some.

This is my code:

static void Main(string[] args) {
    IPEndPoint broadcastEP =
        new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("239.255.255.250"), 1900);

    using (var udp = new UdpClient(broadcastEP.Port)) {
        udp.JoinMulticastGroup(broadcastEP.Address);
        while (true) {
            IPEndPoint remoteEP = null;
            Console.WriteLine("Listening for data on port " + broadcastEP.Port);
            byte[] buffer = udp.Receive(ref remoteEP);
            Console.WriteLine("Received " + buffer.Length + " data bytes from " + remoteEP);
        }
    }   
}

If I now sent a broadcast datagram from another process, the above code should pick it up, right?

However when I execute this code in another process, the first process will only pick up the broadcast, if it's been sent from the 192.168.1.7 interface. If I send a broadcast from one of the other interfaces, the first process simply won't receive it. I can see that the broadcast is actually being sent in Wireshark...am I missing something?

static void Main(string[] args) {
    var ifs = new IPAddress[] {
            IPAddress.Parse("192.168.1.7"),
            IPAddress.Parse("192.168.247.1"),
            IPAddress.Parse("169.254.54.231")
        };  
    IPEndPoint broadcastEP =
        new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("239.255.255.250"), 1900);

    using (UdpClient cli = new UdpClient(new IPEndPoint(ifs[0], 0))) {
                IPEndPoint ep = new IPEndPoint(broadcastEP.Address, broadcastEP.Port);
                int n = cli.Send(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 }, 4, ep);
                Console.WriteLine("Sent " + n + " bytes to " + ep);
    }
}

I know Windows runs a service (called SSDPSRV) listening for SSDP broadcasts on port 1900. Could that possibly "swallow" datagrams, so that they won't be delivered to my process? If so, is there anything I can do about this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
To be clear - you have another service waiting on the same port? –  Martin James Dec 8 '13 at 12:18
    
I don't know that you could simultaneously listen (or send) to three network interfaces with the same call. You'll notice that you have to select a different adapter to sniff in Wireshark as well to pick up packets sent to each network card. Am I missing something in your question? –  o_weisman Dec 8 '13 at 12:34
    
What interface is assigned then if I create a UdpClient for listening and only specify the port to listen on in the constructor, as in the above example? I thought it'd listen on all available interfaces then. –  PaulK Dec 8 '13 at 12:37
    
@PaulK I believe that the default interface as defined in Windows but I'm not 100% sure. –  o_weisman Dec 8 '13 at 12:58
    
If I bind the UdpClient manually to a local endpoint like so udp.Client.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 1900)), it should work though, shouldn't it? The documentation about IPAddress.Any says "Provides an IP address that indicates that the server must listen for client activity on all network interfaces". Still the same problem, though... –  PaulK Dec 8 '13 at 13:10

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