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Ok, I'm lost. Why is the 1st function WRONG (squiglies in the lamda expression), but the 2nd one is RIGHT (meaning it compiles)?

    public static Expression<Func<IProduct, string, bool>> IsValidExpression(string val)
    {
        return (h => h.product_name == val);

    }

    public static Expression<Func<IProduct, bool>> IsValidExpression2()
    {
        return (m => m.product_name == "ACE");

    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your first function is going to need two arguments. Func<x,y,z> defines two parameters and the return value. Since you have both an IProduct and a string as parameters, you'll need two arguments in your lambda.

  public static Expression<Func<IProduct, string, bool>> IsValidExpression(string val)
  {
        return ((h, i) => h.product_name == val);
  }

Your second function is only Func<x,y>, so that means that the function signature has but one parameter, and thus your lambda statement compiles.

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Well the function is not using the second argument so I'd say it's not needed but that the signature for the method is wrong –  Rune FS Jan 11 '10 at 22:42
    
Agreed. A succinct way of stating it. –  womp Jan 11 '10 at 22:46
1  
This won't compile, btw... needs (h,i) => –  Marc Gravell Jan 11 '10 at 22:51
    
gah. thanks Marc :) –  womp Jan 11 '10 at 23:12

What is the middle string intended to do? You can make it compile by:

public static Expression<Func<IProduct, string, bool>> IsValidExpression(string val)
{
    return (h,something) => h.product_name == val;
}

Or maybe you mean:

public static Expression<Func<IProduct, string, bool>> IsValidExpression()
{
    return (h,val) => h.product_name == val;
}

?

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My guess is that OP is unaware that val is hoisted and hence not part of the signature for the resulting method of the lambda expression –  Rune FS Jan 11 '10 at 22:40

Func<IProduct, string, bool> is a delegate to a method with the following signature:

bool methodName(IProduct product, string arg2)
{
  //method body
  return true || false;
}

so

public static Expression<Func<IProduct, string, bool>> IsValidExpression(string val)
{
    return (h => h.product_name == val);
}

has a differance between the return type and the returned value. you are trying to return an object of the type Expression<Func<IProduct, bool>>.

the val argument is not an argument to the method you're delegating to but will be hoisted (made part of a class implementing the resulting function) and since it's not an argument to the resulting method it should not be part of the Func type delclaration

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Since this is an Expression (not a delegate) it isn't quite as you describe - there is no "resulting function"; it is an expression tree... –  Marc Gravell Jan 11 '10 at 22:42
    
@marc You're right on the Expression<> being an Expression tree and not a method I strungled for a term for "The method that the Expression tree can be compiled into" which I tryed to formulate as "resulting function" however the statment that well Func<> is a delegate type is correct :) –  Rune FS Jan 11 '10 at 22:46

Before trying to fix the lambda expression be sure that the following references were added to the related cs file:

using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

The lack of these references may cause the same error as well ("Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'System.Linq.Expressions.Lambda Expression' because it is not a delegate type").

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