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I posted a question a while back about trimming a macro variable down that I am using to download a CSV from Yahoo Finance that contains variable information on each pass to the site. The code that was suggested to me to achieve this was as follows:

data _null_;
a = "&testvar.";
call symputx('svar',trim(input(a,$8.)));
run;

That worked great, however I have since needed to redesign the code so that I am declaring multiple macro variables and submitting multiple ones at the same time.

To declare multiple macros at the same time I have used the following lines of code:

%let svar&e. = &svar.;
%put stock_ticker = &&svar&e.;

The varible &e. is an iterative variable that goes up by one everytime. This declares what looks to be an identical macro to the one called &svar. everytime they are put into the log, however the new dynamic macro is now throwing up the original warning message of:

WARNING: The quoted string currently being processed has become more than 262 characters long.  You
         may have unbalanced quotation marks.

That i was getting before i started using the symputx option suggested in my original problem.

The full code for this particular nested macro is listed below:

%macro symbol_var;

/*here the start row and end row created in the macro above are passed to this nested macro and then passed through the*/
/*source dataset. at the end of the loop each ticker macro variable is defined in turn for use in the following nested*/
/*macro, symbol by metric.*/

%do e = &beg_point. %to &end_point. %by 1;

%put stock row in dataset nasdaq ticker = &e.;

%global svar&e;

proc sql noprint;
select symbol
into :testvar
from nasdaq_ticker
where monotonic() = &e.;
quit;

/*convert value to string here*/

data _null_;
a = "&testvar.";
call symputx('svar',trim(input(a,$8.)));
run;

%let svar&e. = &svar.;
%put stock_ticker = &&svar&e.;


%end;
%mend;

%symbol_var;

Anyone have any suggestions how I could declare the macro &&svar&e. directly into the call synputx step? It currently throws up an error saying that the macro variable being created cannot contain any special characters. Ive tried using &QUOTE, %NRQUOTE and %NRBQUOTE but either I have used the function in an invalid context or I haven't got the syntax exactly right.

Thanks

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1  
It would be helpful if you could provide a sample of the dataset nasdaq_ticket and the exact error message from the log –  Dmitry Shopin Dec 8 '13 at 16:55

2 Answers 2

Try

call symputx("svar&e",trim(input(a,$8.)));

You need double quotes ("") to resolve the e macro.

As an aside, I am not sure you need the input statement if $testvar is a string and not a number.

I would have written this as

%macro whatever();
proc sql noprint;
select count(*)
into :n
from nasdaq_ticker;

select strip(symbol) 
into :svar1 - :svar%left(&n)
from nasdaq_ticker;
quit;

%do i=1 %to &n;
   %put stock_ticker = &&svar&i;
%end;
%mend;
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Isn't this as simple as the following two line data step?

%macro symbol_var;

/*here the start row and end row created in the macro above are passed to this nested macro and then passed through the*/
/*source dataset. at the end of the loop each ticker macro variable is defined in turn for use in the following nested*/
/*macro, symbol by metric.*/

data _null_;
   set nasdaq_ticker(firstobs=&beg_point. obs=&end_point.);
   call symputx('svar' || strip(_n_), symbol);
run;

%mend;

%symbol_var;

Or the following (which includes debugging output)

%macro symbol_var;

/*here the start row and end row created in the macro above are passed to this nested macro and then passed through the*/
/*source dataset. at the end of the loop each ticker macro variable is defined in turn for use in the following nested*/
/*macro, symbol by metric.*/

data _null_;
   set nasdaq_ticker(firstobs=&beg_point. obs=&end_point.);
   length varname $ 32;
   varname = 'svar' || strip(_n_);
   call symputx(varname, symbol);

   put varname '= ' symbol;
run;

%mend;

%symbol_var;

When manipulating macro variables and desiring bullet-proof code I often find myself reverting to using a data null step. The original post included the problem about a quoted string warning. This happens because the SAS macro parser does not hide the value of your macro variables from the syntax scanner. This means that your data (stored in macro vars) can create syntax errors in your program because SAS attempts to interpret it as code (shudder!). It really makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up to risk my program at the hands of what might be in the data. Using the data step and functions protects you from this completely. You will note that my code never uses an ampersand character other than the observation window points. This makes my code bullet proof regarding what dirty data there may be in the nasdaq_ticker data set.

Also, it is important to point out that both Dom and I wrote code that makes one pass over the nasdaq_ticker data set. Not to bash the original posted code, but looping in that way causes a proc sql invocation for every observation in the result set. This will create very poor performance for large result sets. I recommend developing an awareness of how many times a macro loop is going to cause you to read a data set. I have been bitten by this many times in my own code.

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