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I have a Mongoose schema that uses a numerical value as the _id e.g. 102375848308956134094. When I save the collection and findById in Mongoose or find({ _id: 102375848308956134094 }); in the Mongo shell the correct document is returned though the _id is different to the one previously provided (instead its 102375848308956140000).

This is a problem as if I were to save a collection the the _id 102375848308956134095 (notice the last digit changed from a 4 to a 5), MongoDB errors out (E11000 duplicate key error index... dup key: { : 1.023758483089561e+20).

Is MongoDB treating the Number as a floating point number?

Here is an example query:

> db.users.find({ _id: 102375848308956134094 }).pretty();
{
    "_id" : 102375848308956140000,
    "access_token" : "",
    "access_token_expires" : ISODate(""),
    "given_name" : "Jonathon",
    "refresh_token" : ""
}

NB: I have removed the access_token etc. values.

When that document was saved however, I absolutely specified the _id value to be 102375848308956134094.

Any ideas what is going on?

Here is my schema:

/*jslint es5: true, indent: 2, node:true, nomen: true, maxlen: 80, vars: true*/

'use strict';

module.exports = function (mongoose) {
  var Schema = new mongoose.Schema({
    _id: Number,
    access_token: String,
    access_token_expires: Date,
    given_name: String,
    refresh_token: String
  });

  return mongoose.model('User', Schema);
};

And this is the upsert:

...

models.user.update(
  {
    _id: user.id
  },
  {
    access_token: access_token,
    access_token_expires: new Date(Date.now() + (59 * 60 * 1000)),
    given_name: user.given_name,
    refresh_token: refresh_token
  },
  {
    upsert: true
  },
  /*TODO: Handle upsert errors*/
  function (err, numberAffected, raw) {
    if (err) {
      console.log(err);
    } else {
      delete req.session.state;

      req.session._id = user.id;

      res.redirect('/');
    }
  }
);

...

All help, as always, is much appreciated!

/Edit/

I have tried @JohnnyHK's answer of using Long numbers however, the _id still seems to be stored incorrectly in the document. It is saving the _id as -8304616133301175602 instead of 102375848308956134094. I have tried several queries to find the document but only only supplying the _id as -8304616133301175602 returns the correct document e.g.

> db.users.find().pretty();
{
    "_id" : NumberLong("-8304616133301175602"),
    "access_token" : "ya29.1.AADtN_VyfAvBlam2HCERpI0JcJkcwg22t1124tZw0G7pgRyTcaIuGU-dX3H4Q-M",
    "access_token_expires" : ISODate("2013-12-09T12:42:53.098Z"),
    "given_name" : "Jonathon",
    "refresh_token" : "1/-2GQ_s3JogCr45Z1CBKWBHTEcjE0Nda9xkpFFdl7wT0"
}
> db.users.find({ _id: 102375848308956134094 }).pretty();
> db.users.find({ _id: NumberLong(102375848308956134094) }).pretty();
> db.users.find({ _id: NumberLong('102375848308956134094') }).pretty();
Mon Dec  9 11:46:26.433 Error: could not convert "102375848308956134094" to NumberLong
> db.users.find({ _id: -8304616133301175602 }).pretty();
{
    "_id" : NumberLong("-8304616133301175602"),
    "access_token" : "",
    "access_token_expires" : ISODate(""),
    "given_name" : "Jonathon",
    "refresh_token" : ""
}

Any thoughts as to why this may be?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The Number schema type is a 64-bit float, which doesn't have enough resolution to accurately represent 102375848308956134094, so it ends up rounded off to 102375848308956140000.

One solution is to use the mongoose-long plugin (created by the author of Mongoose) so that you can use a 64-bit integer for your _id like this:

var Schema = new mongoose.Schema({
    _id: {SchemaTypes.Long},
    access_token: String,
    access_token_expires: Date,
    given_name: String,
    refresh_token: String
});

UPDATE

Your numeric _id values are actually larger than 64-bits, so you'll have to use a string instead if you can't make them smaller.

var Schema = new mongoose.Schema({
    _id: String,
    access_token: String,
    access_token_expires: Date,
    given_name: String,
    refresh_token: String
});
share|improve this answer
    
I sort of thought something like that was happening. Thanks! Would it cause any issues to store the _id as a String instead. Apart from obviously no errors would be thrown if I were to try and insert a String. I am not doing any calculations on the Number so I could not see a problem other than perhaps a performance issue? I come from a MySQL background where different types of data consume different amounts of space and performance could be impacted. Any thoughts on this? – Jonathon Oates Dec 8 '13 at 17:23
    
@JonathonOates Storing it as a string would work fine, but it would be much less efficient as it's 2 bytes per char; so 42 bytes instead of 8 for the 64-bit integer. You can still pass the Long values around as strings and Mongoose will convert for you when actually interacting with the DB so I'd go with Long. – JohnnyHK Dec 8 '13 at 17:57
    
The Long 'appears' to be stored incorrectly in the collection and I can not find the record unless I query the exact (incorrect) number stored as the _id. I'll edit my question with an example :-) – Jonathon Oates Dec 9 '13 at 11:52
    
@JonathonOates Ah, it looks like your numeric _id values are actually larger than 64-bits! So if you can't make them smaller you'll have to use a string. – JohnnyHK Dec 9 '13 at 13:23
    
String it is then! If you edit the answer to reflect this then I'll accept (again)! – Jonathon Oates Dec 9 '13 at 13:25

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