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I was checking out this link here: How could I write a Perl script to calculate the MD5 sum of every file in a directory?

It gets the md5 of each file in a specified directory. What i want to do is take those md5's and compare them against an array. This is what i have so far.

use warnings;
use strict;
use Digest::MD5 qw(md5_hex);

my $dirname = "./";
opendir( DIR, $dirname );
my @files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);

print "@files\n";

foreach my $file (@files) {
    if ( -d $file || !-r $file ) { next; }
    open( my $FILE, $file );
    binmode($FILE);
    print Digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest, " $file\n";
    my @array = ('667fc8db8e5519cacbf8f9f2af2e0b08');
        if (@array ~~ $FILE) {
            print "matches array", "\n";
        } else {
            print "doesnt match array", "\n";
    }
}
system ( 'pause' )


But with this, i always get doesnt match array no matter if it does match the array perfectly. I can print @array and it will even show the same md5 values of the file. But like i said it just always says "doesnt match array". ive never got it to say "matches array" on any file. Thank you for looking :)

EDIT: This is what i have now.

use warnings;
use strict;
use Digest::MD5 qw(md5_hex);

my $dirname = "./";
opendir( DIR, $dirname );
my @files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);

print "@files\n";

foreach my $file (@files) {
    next if -d $file || !-r $file;
    open( my $FILE, $file );
    binmode($FILE);
    #print digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest, " $file\n";
    Sdigest = Digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest, " $file\n";

    my @array = ('667fc8db8e5519cacbf8f9f2af2e0b08');
        if($digest eq $array[0]) {
            print "matches array", "\n";
        } else {
            print "doesnt match array", "\n";
    }
}
system ( 'pause' );


Thanks to all for your help. You guys are awesome ;)

share|improve this question
    
Fix your format. Hard to tell what's going on here with the weird indents. –  Cfreak Dec 8 '13 at 16:55
    
ok ill do that now. thanks –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 16:57
    
Surely you want to match it to the first element of the array? $array[0] –  Mark Setchell Dec 8 '13 at 16:58
    
And you want to match the hex digest to the first element of the array, whereas you are matching the file handle to the whole array. –  Mark Setchell Dec 8 '13 at 16:59
    
Why do you need an array here, when you have only one value you're interested in comparing against? –  Joe Z Dec 8 '13 at 17:00
show 1 more comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please do not use smartmatch ~~. It was declared experimental in the latest release of Perl, and the semantics are likely to change in the future.

The best solution is to create a hash of the fingerprints you know:

my %fingerprints;
$fingerprints{"667fc8db8e5519cacbf8f9f2af2e0b08"} = undef;

If you want to load a whole array of fingerprints into the hash so that we can easily test for existence, you can use a hash slice:

@fingerprints{@array} = ();

Next, we store the fingerprint of the current file in a variable:

my $digest = Digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest;

Then we test if that $digest exists in the hash of fingerprints:

if (exists $fingerprints{$digest}) {
  print "$digest for <$file> -- FOUND\n";
}
else {
  print "$digest for <$file>\n";
}

Using a hash is usually faster than looping through an array (If you do multiple lookups).


Suggested complete program:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw< say >;
use autodie;  # automatic error handling
use Digest::MD5;

my ($dirname, $fingerprint_file) = @ARGV; # takes two command line arguments
length $dirname          or die "First argument must be a directory name\n";
length $fingerprint_file or die "Second argument must be a file with fingerprints\n";

# load the fingerprints
my %fingerprints;
open my $fingerprints_fh, "<", $fingerprint_file;
while (<$fingerprints_fh>) {
  chomp;
  $fingerprints{$_} = undef;
}
close $fingerprints_fh;

opendir my $directory, $dirname;
while(my $file = readdir $directory) {
  next if not -f $file;

  open my $fh, "<:raw", "$dirname/$file";
  my $digest = Digest::MD5->new->addfile($fh)->hexdigest;
  close $fh;

  if (exists $fingerprints{$digest}) {
    say qq($digest "$file" -- FOUND);
  }
  else {
    say qq($digest "$file");
  }
}
closedir $directory;

Example invocation

> perl script.pl . digests.txt
share|improve this answer
    
This works as well. Though all answers worked, this honestly may be the way to go in my situation. Since i can update the digests.txt file, i wont have to keep updating the script. just the .txt file. Thanks :) –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 17:56
    
cannot specify files path unless they are in same directory "./" if i try to specify "script.pl C:/Users/Username/Desktop/check this/ C:/digests/digests.txt" it completes with no errors, but it doesnt output anything. ive tried with "/" and "//" and "\\" in directory path. –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 19:08
    
i would love to add this to right click context menu. i can make it to exe. i just get errors when i try to run it as i cannot specify paths in the script. –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 19:35
1  
@james28909 Silly me, I forgot that readdir only returns filenames, not paths. I made a quick fix (although this isn't the correct way to do it). Because the script takes arguments, you should run it via the command line. I do not know how one would add an entry to the context-menu, and be able to give the script correct arguments. –  amon Dec 8 '13 at 19:44
add comment

Perhaps the following will be helpful:

use warnings;
use strict;
use Digest::MD5 qw(md5_hex);
use File::Basename;

my $dirname = './';
my %MD5s    = (
    '667fc8db8e5519cacbf8f9f2af2e0b08' => 1,
    '8c0452b597bc2c261ded598a65b043b9' => 1
);

for my $file ( grep { !-d and -r } <$dirname*> ) {
    open my $FILE, '<', $file or die $!;
    binmode $FILE;
    my $md5hexdigest = Digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest;
    close $FILE;

    print basename ($file), " md5hexdigest $md5hexdigest ";

    if ( $MD5s{$md5hexdigest} ) {
        print "matches hash", "\n";
    }
    else {
        print "doesn't match hash", "\n";
    }
}

Sample output:

XOR_String_Match.pl md5hexdigest 8c0452b597bc2c261ded598a65b043b9 matches hash
zipped.txt md5hexdigest d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e doesn't match hash
share|improve this answer
    
That works lovely. so hashes are better to use than arrays? or just for this particular instance? –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 17:43
1  
@james28909 Hashes are good if the order of elements is not important. They use a special data structure that makes it very fast to find an element. –  amon Dec 8 '13 at 17:49
add comment

Like this:

my $digest = Digest::MD5->new->addfile($FILE)->hexdigest, " $file\n";

then

if($digest eq $array[0])

By the way, it would maybe be slightly more idiomatic to say (earlier on in your code):

next if -d $file || !-r $file;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :-) Corrected. –  Mark Setchell Dec 8 '13 at 17:01
1  
Too much bash will kill you. –  Mark Setchell Dec 8 '13 at 17:03
    
I have to agree. :-) –  Joe Z Dec 8 '13 at 17:04
    
Can't locate object method "new" via package "digest::MD5" (perhaps you forgot to load "digest::MD5". i just tried ppm and cpan and i cannot locate Sdigest::MD5. I tired use Sdigest::MD5 qw(md5_hex); but it fails with same error message. –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 17:15
    
updated original question. –  james28909 Dec 8 '13 at 17:20
show 1 more comment

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