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I want to write a function that goes through an IEnumerable. For each item in the IEnumerable it gets an enum property. If everything in the IEnumerable has the same value for that property, then that value is returned. Otherwise, it returns null. I can do this, but not elegantly. Is there a Linq expression I can use? See the UniqueOption function below.

namespace Play
{
public enum Option
{
    Tom,
    Dick,
    Harry
}

public class OptionHolder
{
    public Option Option { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Option.ToString();
    }
}

public class Program
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    private static void Main()
    {
        Program p1 = new Program(Option.Tom, Option.Dick, Option.Harry);
        Console.WriteLine("1: "+p1.UniqueOption());     //should be null
        Program p2 = new Program(Option.Dick, Option.Dick, Option.Dick);
        Console.WriteLine("2: " + p2.UniqueOption());   //should be Dick
        Program p3 = new Program(Option.Harry);         
        Console.WriteLine("3: " + p3.UniqueOption());   //should be Harry
    }

    public Program(params Option[] options)
    {
        optionList = new List<OptionHolder>();
        foreach (Option option in options)
        {
            OptionHolder holder = new OptionHolder();
            holder.Option = option;
            optionList.Add(holder);
        }
    }

    /**
     * If all the OptionHolders in the Holders property have the same Option, return this.
     * Otherwise (there are no OptionHolders, or there is more than one but they hold different Options), return null.
     */
    public Option? UniqueOption()
    {
        Option? option = null;

        foreach(OptionHolder holder in optionList) {
            Option o = holder.Option;
            if (option == null)
            {
                option = o;
            }
            else if (option != o)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
        return option;
    }

    private List<OptionHolder> optionList;

    public IEnumerable<OptionHolder> Holders
    {
        get { return optionList; }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Join(",", optionList);
    }
}

}

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use Distinct() with Take(2) to stop enumerating the list as soon as two different options are found, then check whether exactly one distinct option was found (as opposed to zero or two):

public Option? UniqueOption()
{
    Option[] options = optionList.Select(holder => holder.Option).Distinct().Take(2).ToArray();
    return options.Length == 1 ? options[0] : (Option?)null;
}

UPDATE: To check how many values are actually enumerated, you can use the following helper method:

public static IEnumerable<T> Trace<T>(IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    foreach (T value in values)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Yielding {0}...", value);
        yield return value;
    }
}

Call it like this:

Option[] options = Trace(optionList).Select(holder => holder.Option).Distinct().Take(2).ToArray();

This shows that p1 enumerates only Tom and Dick, not Harry.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks good Michael. Are you sure it only enumerates enough values to get two distinct ones? I might test this out to see. –  Paul Richards Dec 10 '13 at 8:44
1  
@PaulRichards: See my updated answer. –  Michael Liu Dec 10 '13 at 15:27
    
Thanks Michael, you are right - that is an elegant and efficient solution. –  Paul Richards Dec 10 '13 at 15:55

If I understand correctly then you can use Linq's Distinct method.

public Option? UniqueOption()
{
    var distinct = optionList.Select(x=> x.Option).Distinct();
    if(distinct.Count() == 1)
    {
        return distinct.First();
    }
    return null;
}

public Option? UniqueOptionOptimized()
{
    HashSet<Option> set = new HashSet<Option>();
    foreach (var item in optionList)
    {
        if (set.Add(item.Option) && set.Count > 1)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    if (set.Count == 1)
        return set.First();
    else
        return null;
}

public Option? UniqueOptionOptimized2()
{
    using(var distinctEnumerator = optionList.Select(x => x.Option).Distinct().GetEnumerator())
    {
        if(distinctEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            var firstOption = distinctEnumerator.Current;
            if(!distinctEnumerator.MoveNext())
                return firstOption;
        }
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution would work but its inefficient. If there are 1000 elements and the first two have different values for the property, there is no need to do anything with the other 998 elements. –  Paul Richards Dec 8 '13 at 18:58
    
@PaulRichards Updated my answer for performance –  Sriram Sakthivel Dec 8 '13 at 19:08
2  
@PaulRichards: I believe you want the whiskey in the barrel and the wife drunk at same time. Linq is everything but efficient! Either you want a Linq-way for elegance and versatility, or you choose an optimized but hard-way. My solution as well as the first of Sriram ARE Linq, other are not. –  Mario Vernari Dec 9 '13 at 4:53
    
I realise that Linq isn't known for its efficiency @Mario Vernari. However, the Any method doesn't necessarily iterate through every item. I already have my solutions, but I am going to have a think about this some more. –  Paul Richards Dec 9 '13 at 13:24
1  
@MarioVernari LINQ isn't particularly inefficent in general; in fact most people tend to think that it's much less efficient than it is. Of course, if its not used properly (for example, by using methods that iterate entire sequences when they could short circuit) it can result in poor performance. –  Servy Dec 10 '13 at 15:55

The below function should fit your needing. However, I tried it with a simpler app, but you should be able to arrange as you wish.

    public Option? UniqueOption(params Option[] args)
    {
        if (args == null)
            return null;  //or maybe throws?

        var d = args.Distinct().ToArray();
        return d.Length != 1
            ? d[0]
            : new Nullable<Option>();
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
if d.Length == 0 then d[0] raise exception –  Grundy Dec 8 '13 at 17:20
    
@Grundy: you are right! –  Mario Vernari Dec 8 '13 at 17:23
    
This has the same performance issue as Sriram Sakthivel's solution. –  Paul Richards Dec 8 '13 at 19:00
[STAThread]
private static void Main()
{

    Option tested = Option.Paul;
    Program p4 = new Program(Option.Paul, Option.Paul, Option.Paul);
    Console.WriteLine("4: " + p4.UniqueOption(tested));

}
public Option? UniqueOption(Option tested)
{
    if (optionList.All(o => o.Option == tested))
        return tested;

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
My UniqueOption function has no parameter. Your solution does not meet my requirements because we don't know what the value of the unique option is. –  Paul Richards Dec 8 '13 at 19:02

I ended up using something that wasn't too different from my original solution. I'm going to take another look at this though, when I get some more time.

public Option? UniqueOption()
{            
        IEnumerator<OptionHolder> enumerator = Holders.GetEnumerator();
        bool hasMoreElements;
        Option? result=null;
        do
        {
           hasMoreElements = enumerator.MoveNext();
           if (hasMoreElements)
           {
              Option? option = enumerator.Current.Option;
              result = (result != null && result != option) ? null : option; 
           }
        } 
        while (hasMoreElements && result != null);
        return result; 
} 
share|improve this answer

Yet another variant:

public Option? UniqueOption()
{
    if(!optionList.Any()) return null;
    var first = optionList.First();
    return optionList.All(a => first.Option == a.Option) ? (Option?)first.Option : null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a straightforward solution. However, if optionList were a deferred query instead of a List<OptionHolder>, the query would be evaluated multiple times. –  Michael Liu Dec 10 '13 at 15:45
    
@MichaelLiu yep, but in sample its list :-) –  Grundy Dec 11 '13 at 6:34

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