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I am trying to make a contour plot like:

contour

Using a table of data like 3 columns in a txt file, with a long number of lines.

Using this code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.interpolate

data = np.loadtxt(r'dataa.txt')

a = [data[:,0]]
b = [data[:,1]]
n = [data[:,2]]

x = np.asarray(a)
y = np.asarray(b)
z = np.asarray(n)

print "x = ", x
print "y = ", y
print "z = ", z

fig=plt.figure()

CF = contour(x,y,z,colors = 'k')

plt.xlabel("X")
plt.ylabel("Y")
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

I don't know why, it is not working. Python gives me the right axes for the values that I am expecting to see, but in the graph is just a blank and I know that it is importing the data in right way because it shows me my values before the plot.

Example of table: (the diference is because my table has 90000 lines) enter image description here

Using this code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.interpolate

N = 1000 #number of points for plotting/interpolation

x, y, z = np.genfromtxt(r'dataa.txt', unpack=True)

xi = np.linspace(x.min(), x.max(), N)
yi = np.linspace(y.min(), y.max(), N)
zi = scipy.interpolate.griddata((x, y), z, (xi[None,:], yi[:,None]), method='cubic')

fig = plt.figure()
plt.contour(xi, yi, zi)
plt.xlabel("X")
plt.ylabel("Y")
plt.show()

Ive got this result: enter image description here I think I've got the advices wrongly.

share|improve this question
    
Are x and y regularly spaced? If not, you'll need to interpolate to make a contour plot. If so, you can use them to populate a 2d array. –  askewchan Dec 8 '13 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Followup from my comment... first, I would replace all these lines:

data = np.loadtxt(r'dataa.txt')

a = [data[:,0]]
b = [data[:,1]]
n = [data[:,2]]

x = np.asarray(a)
y = np.asarray(b)
z = np.asarray(n)

With:

x, y, z = np.genfromtxt(r'dataa.txt', unpack=True)

Your original code is adding an extra axis at the front, since [data[:,0]] is a list of arrays with one element. The result is that x.shape will be (1, N) instead if (N,). All of this can be done automatically using the last line above, or you could just use the same data loading and say:

x = data[:,0]
y = data[:,1]
z = data[:,2]

since those slices will give you an array back.

However, you're not quite done, because plt.contour expects you to give it a 2d array for z, not a 1d array of values. Right now, you seem to have z values at given x, y points, but contour expects you to give it a 2d array, like an image.

Before I can answer that, I need to know how x and y are spaced. If regularly, you can just populate an array pretty easily. If not regularly, you basically have to interpolate before you can make a contour plot.

To do the interpolation, use

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.interpolate

N = 1000 #number of points for plotting/interpolation

x, y, z = np.genfromtxt(r'dataa.txt', unpack=True)

xi = np.linspace(x.min(), x.max(), N)
yi = np.linspace(y.min(), y.max(), N)
zi = scipy.interpolate.griddata((x, y), z, (xi[None,:], yi[:,None]), method='cubic')

fig = plt.figure()
plt.contour(xi, yi, zi)
plt.xlabel("X")
plt.ylabel("Y")
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
I've made some alterations in my question using your coment... But it still didnt solve my problem, I think I've got it wrong, but I have a right line shape, what is better than before that I had blank. Thank you. –  Macedo Dec 8 '13 at 20:11
1  
It looks like probably the problem is in the interpolation. Try fiddling with the method, or N. One thing you can do to test things is plt.scatter(x, y, c=z) which does a scatter plot of your points, and colors them by the z value. –  askewchan Dec 8 '13 at 20:23

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