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I'm fairly new to PHP and am looking for some best practices on how to implement authentication in PHP.

I'm an evangelist for Adobe and one of the things that annoys me is when people use Flex/Flash for the login screen. So I want to do a blog post/example on using an HTML/PHP login page and then passing the session information to Flex -after- the session has been set.

I'm still wrapping my head around exactly what PHP needs to create a valid session and how it sets cookies. So examples or information that specifically relate to that would be very helpful.

Thanks in advance,

=Ryan ryan@adobe.com

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As has been said, there's quite a lot to creating a robust and secure authentication system in PHP, but the fundamentals are easy to grasp.

The first thing you want to do is call session_start(). Once you've done this you can get and set session variables using the $_SESSION superglobal:

session_start();
$_SESSION['foo'] = $foo;
$bar = $_SESSION['bar'];

Once you've done this you can set log in details for the current user upon a successful log in and have them persist over pages (remembering to call session_start before using them). Also, session_start must be called before any content is sent to the browser.

There are security issues to consider, such as session fixation and cookie theft, however. One approach to session fixation, for example, is to regenerate the user's session ID upon elevation of privileges using PHP's session_regenerate_id (or something like that).

The PHP Security Consortium has lots of useful info.

Cookies can be manipulated using the setcookie function.

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When you say "the first thing you want to do is call session_start()" do you mean I should do that before I even check login credentials? It seems like that's the correct way to implement it and then on a successful login I'd change those session variables (say, change $_SESSION['logged_in'] from false to true). Is that correct? –  ryanstewart Jan 12 '10 at 2:03
    
Yep, that's right. You can't access $_SESSION without first initializing the session; you have to do this on every page. –  Will Vousden Jan 12 '10 at 9:19
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That's a fairly broad topic. However, a good understanding of sessions/cookies would be a good base. You should take a look at Chris Shiflett's blog - he has a lot of good posts about these topics.

I'm an evangelist for Adobe and one of the things that annoys me is when people use Flex/Flash for the login screen. So I want to do a blog post/example on using an HTML/PHP login page and then passing the session information to Flex -after- the session has been set.

I'm not entirely sure on your goal here. Do you need the Flash component to authenticate the user? Since this is a client-side technology, such an authentication would have limited scope.

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In a lot of cases, Flash/Flex will handle the session and talk directly to PHP to authenticate. So what I'm looking to do is use the HTML hooks in the Flash Player to pull "normal" cookie/session information that would be used in a regular PHP login page and pass that to the Flash Player so the Player can make authenticated requests to the PHP server. –  ryanstewart Jan 11 '10 at 23:51
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Create login.php page with a form something like:

<form method="post" action="login.php">
<input type="text" name="username">
<input type="password" name="password">
<input type="submit" name="submLogin">
</form>

then add your php logic:

<?
if(isset($submLogin))
{
 $username = $_POST['username'];
 $password = $_POST['password'];

// run checks on vars not to pass on silly data + escape chars

 $query_login = 'SELECT * FROM users 
 WHERE username = ' . $username . ' AND password = ' . $password . ' LIMIT 1';
 $login = mysql_query($query_login, $db_connection) or die();
 $login_result = mysql_num_rows($login);

 if($login_result == 1)
 {
  // success
  session_start();
  $_SESSION['logged_in'] = TRUE;
  // redirect somewhere, set cookies, do whatever you want to do on success
 }
 else
 {
  // fail
  // display error or redirect
 }
}  
?>

$db_connection variable is the link identifier - result of mysql_connect() or mysql_pconnect()

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1  
Directly using the username and password in the SQL query is very unsecure way against SQL injection. You should at least use htmlentities function to clear the username and password before using in SQL query. Just for your information. –  subet Feb 7 at 8:57
    
@subet I've just had one of those "Who the hell wrote this thing" moment when I looked at my code above. Yeah, definitely don't do what I did up in my answer and sanitize the input. Then again, it's mentioned in comments (in code). –  LukeP Feb 7 at 10:06
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Dump PHP and get into ASP.NET. All this is already done, along with the security and membership details. =)

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3  
Lol this comment is worthless and just flaming. But I think he had enough down voting for now –  Alfred Jan 11 '10 at 23:49
    
I wish someone gave me such "worthless" advice when I was starting in PHP years ago. =) Anyone want a stack of PHP Architect magazines? Such a shame to put them in the fireplace. –  Heckflosse_230 Jan 13 '10 at 0:16
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