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I have been attempting to create a very simple asteroid game using OpenGL, GLUT, and C++.

I cannot figure out for the life of me why this is happening, but on key press "a" or "d" I want the triangle to rotate along its Z axis. The problem is that when those keys are pressed, the glRotatef() rotates about the 0,0 position or the bottom left of the screen. I have tried many different approaches, tutorials and the code I'm going to link is the best running example.

I'm sure I'm missing something, but I cannot get the triangle to rotate about itself and not the origin of the screen.

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>  
#include <GL/glut.h>

//g++ -o game.exe -Wall main.cpp glut32.lib -lopengl32 -lglu32 -static-libgcc -static-libstdc++

float posX = 0, posY = 0, posZ = 0;

int width = 100, height = 100;
int triangle_height = 5, triangle_width = 4;
float move_unit = 1;

void display() {

    std::cout << "display" << std::endl;

    //glLoadIdentity();

    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(posX, posY, posZ);
    glColor3f(1,1,1); //sets the current color to white
        glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES); //tells openGL we are going to draw some triangles

            //glTranslatef(0, 0, 0);
            glVertex2i( width/2 , height/2 ); //specifies the first vertext of our triangle
            glVertex2i( width/2 + triangle_width , height/2 ); //specifies the second vertext of our triangle
            glVertex2i( width/2 , height/2 + triangle_height); //specifies the third vertext of our triangle

        glEnd(); //tells openGL that we are done drawing

    glPopMatrix();
    glutSwapBuffers();

    glFlush();

}

void keyboard(unsigned char key, int x, int y) {

    switch(key) {

        case 'w':
            std::cout << "moving up" << std::endl;
            posY += move_unit;
        break;

        case 's':
            std::cout << "moving down" << std::endl;
            posY -= move_unit;
        break;

        case 'a':
            std::cout << "rotate left" << std::endl;
            glRotatef(5.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
        break;

        case 'd':
            std::cout << "rotate right" << std::endl;
            glRotatef(5.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);
        break;

    }

    glutPostRedisplay();

}

void init() {

    glClearColor(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); //changes the current matrix to the projection matrix
    glLoadIdentity();
    gluOrtho2D(0, width, 0, height);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    glutInit(&argc, argv); //inits the GLUT framework

    glutInitWindowSize(800, 600);
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_RGB);
    glutCreateWindow("Eric's Game");

    init();

    glutDisplayFunc(display);
    glutKeyboardFunc(keyboard);

    glutMainLoop(); // Infinite event loop

    return 0;

}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

OpenGL applies matrices in the reverse order. In other words, if you want to rotate and then translate, you need to call glRotatef after glTranslatef. The best way to do this would be to store the current rotation explicitly, rather than just making a series of calls to glRotatef:

float rotation = 0.0;

void display() {
    // ...
    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(posX, posY, posZ);
    glRotatef(rotation, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
    // Rewrite triangle vertex coordinates to be centered at (0, 0)
    glPopMatrix();
    // ...
}

void keyboard(unsigned char key, int x, int y) {
    switch(key) {
        // ...
        case 'a':
            std::cout << "rotate left" << std::endl;
            rotation += 5.0f;
            break;

        case 'd':
            std::cout << "rotate right" << std::endl;
            rotation -= 5.0f;
            break;
    }
    // ...
}

As a general rule, you should only ever call OpenGL functions inside your draw routines.

share|improve this answer
    
Well your suggestion worked perfectly and using the rotation variable is like a "duh" moment, haha. However, how do I center the object on the screen then? This has been my problem, I want the triangle to be centered on the screen instead of the lower left corner. glVertex2i( 0 , 0 ); glVertex2i( 0 + triangle_width , 0 ); glVertex2i( 0 , 0 + triangle_height); – neurosnap Dec 8 '13 at 20:46
1  
Initialize posX and posY to be half the screen width/height, and you should be good. – godel9 Dec 8 '13 at 20:47

Since the rotation is applied on the origin, you should concatenate three transformations:
1. First you translate your triangle on the origin
2. Then you apply the rotation
3. After that, you reverse the first translation, in order to put it back in its original position.

share|improve this answer

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