Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using PHP 5.3 I'm experiencing weird / non-intuitive behavior when applying empty() to dynamic object properties fetched via the __get() overload function. Consider the following code snippet:

<?php

class Test {

  protected $_data= array(
   'id'=> 23,
   'name'=> 'my string'
  );

  function __get($k) {
    return $this->_data[$k];
  }

}

$test= new Test();
var_dump("Accessing directly:");
var_dump($test->name);
var_dump($test->id);
var_dump(empty($test->name));
var_dump(empty($test->id));

var_dump("Accessing after variable assignment:");
$name= $test->name;
$id= $test->id;
var_dump($name);
var_dump($id);
var_dump(empty($name));
var_dump(empty($id));

?>

The output of this function is as follow. Compare the results of the empty() checks on the first and second result sets:

Set #1, unexpected result:

string(19) "Accessing directly:"
string(9) "my string"
int(23)
bool(true)
bool(true)

Expecting Set #1 to return the same as Set #2:

string(36) "Accessing after variable assignment:"
string(9) "my string"
int(23)
bool(false)
bool(false)

This is really baffling and non-intuitive. The object properties output non-empty strings but empty() considers them to be empty strings. What's going on here?

share|improve this question
1  
Looks very odd indeed. My only take on this is that empty(), being a language construct, somehow bypasses the getter function. But that would be a huge bug in my understanding - there must be a better explanation. Interested to see what comes up. –  Pekka 웃 Jan 11 '10 at 23:56
    
interestingly, isset() returns true when accessing directly. –  nickf Jan 12 '10 at 0:01
    
Alan Storm got it right, there is a __isset magic function that gets called when a member gets checked by empty(). –  Pekka 웃 Jan 12 '10 at 0:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Based on a reading of the empty's manual page and comments (Ctrl-F for isset and/or double underscores), it looks like this is known behavior, and if you want your __set and __get methods and empty to play nice together, there's an implicit assumption that you implement a __isset magic method as well.

It is a little bit unintuitive and confusing, but that tends to happen with most meta-programming, particularly in a system like PHP.

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me by sixty seconds :) I think this solves the question, though it is hugely counter-intuitive that the __isset magic method returns false by default. –  Pekka 웃 Jan 12 '10 at 0:03
    
so __isset is invoked when you call empty() but not when you call isset() ?? –  nickf Jan 12 '10 at 0:15
    
Per the manual, <a href="us2.php.net/__isset">__isset</a>; should be invoked when use either function. THe implication of what I've read is there's no defined behavior for calling isset or empty with magic methods when there's no __isset function. –  Alan Storm Jan 12 '10 at 1:52

In this example, empty() calls the __isset() overload function, not the __get() overload function. Try this:

class Test {

  protected $_data= array(
   'id'=> 23,
   'name'=> 'my string'
  );

  function __get($k) {
    return $this->_data[$k];
  }

  function __isset($k) {
    return isset($this->_data[$k]);
  }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.