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Below i have a multi dimensional array i wrote which out puts an 8x8 block and displays the starting location of all the pieces in a chess game.

I was wondering about two questions:

  1. how can I add the numbers 1-8 going down the sides and the letter A-H going across from left to right?

  2. when print to console all the the spaces in the array that are not filled remain blank. if i wanted to move a piece say queens pawn up one manually, how can i display the screen again but this time leave the original location the pawn was in as blank, like the rest of the board?

Thank you for your time,

Mark

    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    #include<iomanip>

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        string chess[8][8];

         for (int j=0;j<8;j++)
         {
           chess [1][j]= "P";
           chess [6][j]= "P";
           chess [0][0]="R";
           chess [7][0]="R";
           chess [0][7]="R";
           chess [7][7]="R";
           chess [0][1]="Kn";
           chess [7][1]="Kn";
           chess [0][6]="Kn";
           chess [7][6]="Kn"; 
           chess [0][2]="B";
           chess [7][2]="B";
           chess [0][5]="B";
           chess [7][5]="B"; 
           chess [0][3]="Q";
           chess [7][3]="Q";
           chess [0][4]="Ki";
           chess [7][4]="Ki"; 
        }  
        for (int a=0;a<8;a++)
        {
                for (int b=0;b<8;b++)
                {
                   cout<<setw(4)<<chess[a][b];
                }
            cout<<endl;
        }       
        system ("pause");
    return 0;
    }    
share|improve this question
    
chess rows 3-6 have not been initialized. C/C++ does not put blanks in stack variables automatically. You have to do that. – KeithSmith Dec 8 '13 at 21:45
    
I believe C++ calls default constructor for stack variables, even in array. std::string (as opposed to POD types) is likely to be properly initialized in string chess[8][8]; – nyrl Dec 8 '13 at 22:05

First, move the initialization code and the display code out of main and into two separate functions. (Note that the initialization does not need the second loop and all those if statements; it just does assignments to the array elements, and that works without all the extras). Then, to move the queen's pawn, just do swap(chess[1][3], chess[2][3]) and call display() again.

To display the rank and file markers, just write a line of file markers before you start drawing the board. The rank markers should be written inside the outer for loop in the display code.

share|improve this answer

this is an answer to the first part of the question that I came up with after playing with the suggestions from Nyrl (edited original post per suggestions by Pete Becker)

    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    #include<iomanip>

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        string chess[8][8];

         for (int j=0;j<8;j++)
         {
           chess [1][j]= "P";
           chess [6][j]= "P";
           chess [0][0]="R";
           chess [7][0]="R";
           chess [0][7]="R";
           chess [7][7]="R";
           chess [0][1]="Kn";
           chess [7][1]="Kn";
           chess [0][6]="Kn";
           chess [7][6]="Kn"; 
           chess [0][2]="B";
           chess [7][2]="B";
           chess [0][5]="B";
           chess [7][5]="B"; 
           chess [0][3]="Q";
           chess [7][3]="Q";
           chess [0][4]="Ki";
           chess [7][4]="Ki"; 
        }  
//below is the line to add the Letters for each column manually at the top.

        cout<<setw(4)<<" "<<setw(4)<<'A'<<setw(4)<<'B'<<setw(4)<<'C'<<setw(4)<<'D'<<setw(4)<<'E'<<setw(4)<<'F'<<setw(4)<<'G'<<setw(4)<<'H'<<setw(4)<<endl;
        cout<<endl;
        for (int a=0;a<8;a++)
        {            
            cout<<setw(4)<<a+1; `//adds the numbers before each row`
            for (int b=0;b<8;b++)
                {
                  cout<<setw(4)<<chess[a][b];
                }
            cout<<setw(4)<<a+1; `//adds the numbers after each row`
            cout<<endl;
        } 
//below is the line to add the Letters for each column manually at the bottom.
        cout<<endl;
        cout<<setw(4)<<" "<<setw(4)<<'A'<<setw(4)<<'B'<<setw(4)<<'C'<<setw(4)<<'D'<<setw(4)<<'E'<<setw(4)<<'F'<<setw(4)<<'G'<<setw(4)<<'H'<<setw(4)<<endl;

        system ("pause");
    return 0;
    }    
share|improve this answer

1) Add extra loop range for columns:

cout << "    ";
for (int b=0;b<8;b++)
    cout << setw(4) << static_cast<char>('A'+b);
cout << endl;

Add extra output for rows:

for (int a=0;a<8;a++)
{
    cout << setw(4) << a;
    for (int b=0;b<8;b++)
       cout<<setw(4)<<chess[a][b];
    cout<<endl;
}       

As requested, working example is:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
string chess[8][8];

int main()
{
  cout << "    ";
  for (int c=0; c<8; ++c)
    cout << setw(4) << static_cast<char>('A'+c);
  cout << endl;

  for (int r=0; r<8; ++r)
  {
    cout << setw(4) << r;
    for (int c=0; c<8; ++c)
      cout << setw(4) << chess[r][c];
    cout << endl;
  }
}

2) There are no easy way, but you might get lucky with ESC-codes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code) which allow you to set column/row before printing out on certain terminals.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not entirely sure what the first two additions would do, any chance you could clarify or show what you want it to look like in its entirety. thanks. – Markrwithak Dec 9 '13 at 0:52
    
@Markrwithak Isn't that what you want: how can I add the numbers 1-8 going down the sides and the letter A-H going across from left to right? First loop prints A..H at columns 1..8 (leaving space at column 0), second addition prints digits 1..8 at column 0. It will print 9x9 matrix with headers and 8x8 data. Have I got your question wrong? – nyrl Dec 9 '13 at 1:03
    
ok i was able to add the numbers on the columns by adding the line "cout<<setw(4)<<a+1;" before and after the nested loop. i guess my question remains does the compiler know how to run through consecutive letters of the alphabet? I had not heard of anything like it. – Markrwithak Dec 9 '13 at 4:02
    
@Markrwithak Why not to look at the sample code provided, i.e. cout << setw(4) << ('A'+b);? – nyrl Dec 9 '13 at 5:53
    
@Markrwithak It is worth noting that letters (characters) are just another integral type, for you can add/sub them, and even multiply. They usually become characters only at output, i.e. in cout::operator<<() in your case. – nyrl Dec 9 '13 at 6:06

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