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I'm aware the title sounds a little bit overwhelming, however the key concept is simple.

I'm not too picky on language, it could be any .NET language however I prefer C++.

I want to store a compiled executable inside of another executable, which at runtime will run the other executable from memory, not from disk.

Is this even possible, and if so could someone please provide an example?

I am not referring to a DLL. I'm talking about an independent executable.

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closed as off-topic by πάντα ῥεῖ, lpapp, p.s.w.g, SpringLearner, Devolus Dec 9 '13 at 6:54

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AFAIK, that's totally impossible on Windows; you need to execute some EXE file from disk. –  SLaks Dec 8 '13 at 22:51
    
I strongly believe it's possible as everything on a computer is an open playing ground at a certain level. I just don't personally have the knowledge on how to do it. –  dead beef Dec 8 '13 at 22:52
    
This is just about exactly what fork(); does. The 'second executable' is the body of code run by the child process. –  Gene Dec 8 '13 at 22:52
    
@SLaks Yes, the executable that contains the packed exe. Go an look at executable packers like UPX –  Corey Dec 8 '13 at 22:52
    
@Gene Except that what he is wanting is not to fork a new process of the same executable but to unpack another executable into memory and run it. Not a job for fork(). –  Corey Dec 8 '13 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need something on disk to run there's no way around that. You can make your own executable the shim that you use to load the other exe. Your host program would look something like this:

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "launch")
        {
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.AssemblyResolve += CurrentDomain_AssemblyResolve;
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ExecuteAssemblyByName("TestConsoleApp", "some", "args", DateTime.Now.ToString());
        }
        else
        {
            RunNormally();
        }
    }

    private static void RunNormally()
    {
        string fileName = Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
        fileName = fileName.Replace(".vshost", ""); // hack -- if launched in the debugger must remove this.
        Process.Start(fileName, "launch");

        // do other stuff
    }

    private static Assembly CurrentDomain_AssemblyResolve(object sender, ResolveEventArgs args)
    {
        var asmName = new AssemblyName(args.Name);
        var resourceName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetManifestResourceNames().FirstOrDefault(r => r.Contains(asmName.Name));
        if (resourceName != null)
        {
            using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetManifestResourceStream(resourceName).CopyTo(memoryStream);
                return Assembly.Load(memoryStream.GetBuffer());
            }
        }

        return null;
    }
}

This assumes you have an assembly "TestConsoleApp" as an 'Embedded Resource' in your hosting executable.

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You can create a stub EXE in C# that loads an assembly from bytes using IPC from your process, then uses reflection to find and run a Main() method

However, that EXE will still need to run from disk.

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I'll look into this once I get back from something. I have to leave in a few minutes. –  dead beef Dec 8 '13 at 22:56

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