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I have a TCPDUMP file that contains many uses of the word USER and PASS and I need to work out a regex for finding them all and then printing how many there are for each. (or any different way; regex is my first choice for these problems though). And my split seems to not be working right I think. Not sure how I am doing this wrong here so any ideas? Thanks in advance!

Here is an example of the input file (note: this is just the first line of the file of 2006 lines. The format is identical, but the numbers, symbols, and letters DO change in each line)

22:28:28.374595 IP 98.114.205.102.1821 > 192.150.11.111.445: Flags [S], seq 147554406, win 64240, options [mss 1460,nop,nop,sackOK], length 0E...<.@.q...br.f...o.... ...\.bfP....Y..echo open 0.0.0.0 8884 > USER 1 1 >>

code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;

#opens txt file: read mode
open MYFILE, '<', 'source_file.txt' or die $!;

#opens output txt file: write mode
open OUT, '>', 'Summary_Report.txt' or die $!;

#open output txt file: write mode
#used to store header 'split' info
open OUTFILE, '>', 'Header.txt' or die $!;

my $start_time = undef;
my $end_time;
my $linenum = 0; 
my $user;
my $pass;

while (<MYFILE>) { 
    chomp; 
    $linenum++; 
    #print ": $_\n"; ###if I need to see the lines (check)###

    #separate pieces of information from TCPDUMP into list
    my @header = split (' ',$_);
    print OUTFILE "$linenum: @header\n\n";

    if (/^22:28/ && !defined($start_time)) {
        $start_time = $header[0];
        #print "$start_time\n"; ###used as a check###
    }   

    if ($_ = /22:28/) {
        $end_time = $header[0];
    }       

    if ($_ =~ m/USER/i) {
        $user = $header[10];
    }

    }

print OUT "Total # of times phrases were used:\n\n
USER (variations thereof) = $user\n\n
PASS (variations thereof) = $pass\n\n\n";
share|improve this question
    
Please post how your input looks. –  hwnd Dec 9 '13 at 1:00
    
hopefully what I did helps yah. –  user2288 Dec 9 '13 at 1:02
    
I just realized I need some metacharacters, those might help! not too sure how to go about them though. –  user2288 Dec 9 '13 at 1:13
1  
Your sample record does not match /USER/i. Your if ($_ = /22:28/) { is clobbering $_, just write if(/^22:28/) { Similarly simplify the last match check. –  gwaigh Dec 9 '13 at 2:16
    
like i mentioned, the sample data is only one piece, there are 2000 more lines of that pattern just with different numbers, so PASS and USER will show up sporadically. And thanks for the if statement advice! didnt know you could do that actually! –  user2288 Dec 9 '13 at 2:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
my @lines = (<MYFILE>);
my @matches = grep { $_ =~ /(PASS|USER)/i } @lines;

Should work?

With Line Numbers:

my @lines = (<MYFILE>);
my %results; 
map { 
    if ($lines[$_] =~ /(pass|user)/i) {
      $results{$_} = $lines[$_];
    }
} 0..$#lines;

%results will have keys as line numbers, value is line. Grep is faster because its recursive though, this will be O(n2) iirc.

Now..

map {

  #separate pieces of information from TCPDUMP into list
  my @header = split (' ',$results[$_]);
  print OUTFILE "$_: @header\n\n";

  if (/^22:28/ && !defined($start_time)) {
     $start_time = $header[0];
     #print "$start_time\n"; ###used as a check###
  }   

  if ($results[$_] = /22:28/) {
     $end_time = $header[0];
  }       

  if ($results[$_] =~ m/USER/i) {
      $user = $header[10];
  }

} keys %results;
share|improve this answer
    
that actually did work i believe but it ended up resetting my $linenum variable and my time variables which unfortunately I cannot have happen –  user2288 Dec 9 '13 at 2:50
    
you can push to an index of line numbers give me a sec.. –  Zach Leighton Dec 9 '13 at 3:09

I don't really know perl, but I know regex... and you could use this expression to match any line beginning with 22.28 which also contains USER/PASS:

(?<=22\.28)USER|PASS

I'm not 100% clear on what you need, if you specify further, I can probably help.

share|improve this answer
    
All I am really trying to do is use a regex function to find all instances of the words PASS & USER that are located in my input file. I know the answer is simple but for some reason, whatever I do does not work, so does that help? –  user2288 Dec 9 '13 at 2:01
    
You can create an array using the matches in a string using the following Perl code: @result = $input =~ m/USER|PASS/ig; .... Somehow I think that you are not after something this simple. –  Vasili Syrakis Dec 9 '13 at 2:12

Here's a USER/PASS counting option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %user_pass;

while (<DATA>) {
    $user_pass{$1}++ while /(\bUSER\b|\bPASS\b)/g;
}

print "$_ => $user_pass{$_}\n" for keys %user_pass;

__DATA__
USER USER PASS PASS
PASS
USER
USER
PASS PASS

Output:

PASS => 5
USER => 4

Hope this helps!

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