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I am planning to learn a new scripting language. Just curious should I learn ksh or sh? Which is more powerful? As in, which supports more functionalities?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Danny Beckett, sevenseacat, talonmies, Paul-Jan, Jonesy Mar 4 at 18:16

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
But opinions are based on experience –  Programmer Dec 9 '13 at 7:39
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Questions that are primarily opinion-based are off-topic here. –  Danny Beckett Dec 9 '13 at 7:40
    
Hopefully someone may want to share their years of experience here to help me –  Programmer Dec 9 '13 at 7:54
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no, it won't. The question is off-topic. –  sevenseacat Dec 10 '13 at 9:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Learn both.

sh is the Bourne shell, and is just about the minimum shell you will find anywhere. ksh, the Korn shell, is (mostly) a super-set of sh. That is, anything you do in sh you can do in ksh, but ksh is much more powerful.

BUT. You might not have ksh installed, on some platforms (esp. Linux) bash is more common (although ksh is available as an extra download). Do you need the extra functionality of Korn shell? It is very powerful, but with that power comes a steep learning curve.

By the way, check your Korn shell version. ksh88 is common on older UNIX systems, and is fairly basic, yet the latest version of ksh93 is incredibly powerful.

So, learn sh first, that is really a pre-requisite of ksh. Then learn those features of ksh you need. Very few people know, or need to know, all of the functionality of ksh.

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