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I am new to JavaScript's (prototypal) inheritance and I'm trying to learn more about it. I am using a simple observer pattern as example, in which I want observable objects to be derived from the 'subject' object. This is what I WANT to do:

function subject()
{
    var callbacks = {}

    this.register = function(name, callback)
    {
        callbacks[name] = callback;
    }

    this.unregister = function(name)
    {
        delete callbacks[name];
    }

    var trigger = function()
    {
        var a = arguments;
        var t = this;

        $.each(callbacks, function(name, callback)
        {
            callback.apply(t, a);
        });
    }
}


list.prototype = new subject()

function list()
{
    var items = {}

    this.add = function(name, item)
    {
        items[name] = item;
        trigger('add', name);
    }

    this.remove = function(name)
    {
        delete items[name];
        trigger('remove', name);
    }
}

Now when using the code above like below, I run into my first problem:

var l = new list()
l.register('observer1', function() { console.log(this, arguments) });
l.add('item1', 'value1'); // <-- ReferenceError: trigger is not defined, trigger('add', name);

To continue testing I made the trigger function 'public' using this.trigger instead. Running my example again I run into the next problem:

var l = new list()
l.register('observer1', function() { console.log(this, arguments) });
l.add('item1', 'value1'); // <-- output: subject, ["add", "item1"]

The this object is subject, I want it to be list. My third problem occurs when creating another list:

var l2 = new list();
//Don;t register any observers
l2.add('item1', 'value1'); // <-- output: subject, ["add", "item1"]

The callbacks list is shared between the 2 lists.

I've tried similar things with Object.create(new subject()) as well and run into similar problems.

My 3 questions in this are:

  1. Can I have private methods that can be used in derived objects (and should I even care about having them private or public)?
  2. How can I have the this object I want (without needing to use function.call in the derived object, if possible)?
  3. How can I keep the callbacks list in the base object without it being shared?
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3 Answers 3

An interesting question. As for #1 and #2: let's say you have a function foo:

function foo() {
 var _private = 'private var!';
 this.access = function () {
    return _private;
 }
}

access is a so-called privileged method, it's a closure that can access the private variable private.

you can inherit the whole thing by making use of call, like so:

function bar() {
  foo.call(this);
}

var b = new bar();
console.log(b.output()); // prints 'private var!'

With the methods apply, call and bind you can establish the context of a function, effectively tamper with the this object. (your #2 question, read here )

Naturally you cannot make use of a totally private method in a derived object. You'd need an accessor method which would defeat the purpose of the original method being private. Having said that, that's the way it works in strongly typed languages too (in java if you mark a method as private not even subclases will be able to access it, it would have to be protected).

As for #3, I cannot think of how to keep callbacks shared and private. But you can make it a static property for all instances of a function (much like a static property in a lanaguage like java) by simply declaring a function like:

function foo() {
}

add your prototypes which will be assigned to each instance

foo.prototype.bar = // ...

and a static property

foo.callbacks = [];

All instances of foo will share the callbacks property.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried your suggestion using function bar() { foo.call(this); } and this seems to also solve #3. Trigger is available in List and callbacks is set per list. The only problem this has, is this in the list is now subject. –  Mattie Dec 9 '13 at 11:25
    
I've managed to solve that as well by adding list.constructor = subject; list.prototype.constructor = list; from an example, but I'm unsure what it actually does. –  Mattie Dec 9 '13 at 12:27
    
I suggest you take a look at this, should clear your doubts about this :) –  Joe Minichino Dec 9 '13 at 14:16

You can’t have private methods, and that’s that. It will never work both properly and nicely at the same time, so don’t bother trying to emulate them in JavaScript.

Then all you have to do is call the parent’s constructor in the derived constructor.

function subject()
{
    var callbacks = {};

    this.register = function(name, callback)
    {
        callbacks[name] = callback;
    };

    this.unregister = function(name)
    {
        delete callbacks[name];
    };

    this.trigger = function()
    {
        var a = arguments;
        var t = this;

        $.each(callbacks, function(name, callback)
        {
            callback.apply(t, a);
        });
    };
}


list.prototype = Object.create(subject);
list.prototype.constructor = list;

function list()
{
    subject.call(this);

    var items = {};

    this.add = function(name, item)
    {
        items[name] = item;
        this.trigger('add', name);
    };

    this.remove = function(name)
    {
        delete items[name];
        this.trigger('remove', name);
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
IE9 and lower do not support Object.create though. Also, you are using the subject function to create the list prototype, is this intended? list no longer is instanceof subject then. The trigger funciton works if i make it global scope (trigger =, instead of var trigger =). The issue is with the callbacks list. When I make the callbacks list 'public', and do Object.create(new subject()), then all works as should. Not happy about exposing the callbacks list, but it will have to do. –  Mattie Dec 10 '13 at 18:49
    
@Mattie: All of this is intentional, and Object.create(subject) is close enough to new subject() that you can use it instead if you want ≤IE9 compatibility. Also, list is definitely instanceof subject, and it’s all intentional, yes. –  minitech Dec 10 '13 at 23:47

Incorporating Joe's suggestion, this is what I eventually ended up with:

function subject()
{
    var callbacks = {}

    this.register = function(name, callback)
    {
        callbacks[name] = callback;
    }

    this.unregister = function(name)
    {
        delete callbacks[name];
    }

    trigger = function()
    {
        var a = arguments;
        var t = this;
        $.each(callbacks, function(name, callback)
        {
            callback.apply(t, a);
        });
    }
}

//without the following line, 'this' in firefox is 'subject' instead of 'list' (in chrome it is)
list.prototype = new subject()
//without these, 'list' is not an instanceof 'subject'
list.constructor = subject;
list.prototype.constructor = list;

function list(n)
{
    this.name = n;
    subject.call(this); //as suggested by Joe
    var items = {}

    this.add = function(name, item)
    {
        items[name] = item;
        trigger.call(this, 'add', name); //no way to do this without using call/apply
    }

    this.remove = function(name)
    {
        delete items[name];
        trigger.call(this, 'remove', name); //no way to do this without using call/apply
    }

    this.getitems = function() { return items }
}

//without the following line, 'this' in firefox is 'subject' instead of 'queue'
queue.prototype = new subject()
//without these, 'queue' is not an instanceof 'subject'
queue.constructor = subject;
queue.prototype.constructor = queue;

function queue(n)
{
    this.name = n;
    subject.call(this); //as suggested by Joe
    var items = [];

    this.enqueue = function(item)
    {
        items.push(item);
        trigger.call(this, 'enqueue', item); //no way to do this without using call/apply
    }

    this.dequeue = function()
    {
        var d = items.shift();
        trigger.call(this, 'dequeue', d); //no way to do this without using call/apply
        return d;
    }

    this.getitems = function() { return items }
}

var l1 = new list('l1')

l1.register('observer1', function() { console.log('l1', this, arguments) });
l1.add('item1', 'value1');
// ^ 'l1', list { name = 'l1' ... }, ['add', 'item1']

var l2 = new list('l2')
l2.register('observer2', function() { console.log('l2', this, arguments) });
l2.add('item2', 'value2');
// ^ 'l2', list { name = 'l2' ... }, ['add', 'item2']

var q1 = new queue('q1')
q1.register('observer3', function() { console.log('q1', this, arguments) });
q1.enqueue('item3');
// ^ 'q1', queue { name = 'q1' ... }, ['enqueue', 'item3']

console.log(l1 instanceof list, l1 instanceof subject, l1 instanceof queue);
// ^ true, true, false
console.log(q1 instanceof list, q1 instanceof subject, q1 instanceof queue);
// ^ false, true, true

This ticks all of my boxes (except for the use of call, but I can live with that).

Thanks for all the help,

Mattie

EDIT: appearantly this does not work as expected. creating a new object overwrites the other objects callbacks

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