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I am writing a listener class which creates a single HttpListener on random unused port and listens on it. I tried to make it singleton. However I am finding it difficult to keep that singleton object null when listening to random HTTP port fails 10 times.

(I have shown port number and HttpListener instance as members of singleton instance. However there are many other members that I have not shown for simplicity.) This is my code:

class Listener
{
    private static Listener listener = null;  //singleton instance

    //member variables
    private HttpListener httpListener = null;
    private int port = -1;

    static Listener()
    {
        listener = new Listener();
    } 

    private Listener()
    {
        try
        {
            port = //randomly generate
            httpListener = new HttpListener();
            //start listening
        }   
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            //cant listen on randomly chosen port
            listener = null;
        httpListener = null;
            port = -1;
            return;            
        }   
    }
}

However inside catch(), listener = null sets listener to null just for a while. When default constructor returns it returns a new instance of Listener, thus listener inside static constructor always have instance assigned to it. Thus instead of listener = null inside default constructor it should be this = null which is invalid.

Thus I moved the whole code inside static constructor. But that forcesd me to

  • Either make instance members (port and httpListener) static or
  • or use listener.port , listener.httpListener everywhere

    class Listener { private static Listener listener = null; //singleton instance

    //member variables
    private HttpListener httpListener = null;
    private int port = -1;
    
    static Listener()
    {
        listener = new Listener();
    
    try
        {
        listener.port = //randomly generate
            listener.httpListener = new HttpListener();
            //start listening
        }   
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            //cant listen on randomly chosen port
        listener = null;       
            return;            
        } 
    } 
    
    private Listener()
    {  
    }
    

    }

I dont understand

Q1 whether to make port & httpListener static? (This I feel somewhat against OOP principles) or

Q2 whether to keep them as instance members and use listener. everywhere? (This is problematic since there are many such members and methods in my actual code and I have to attach listener. everywhere)

Or I am thinking it all wrong and should have followed different approach?

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to hack a port? –  Fendy Dec 9 '13 at 10:21
    
why singletons are evil. It really doesn't seem in the context you're describing that you need a singleton. –  BartoszKP Dec 9 '13 at 10:21
    
@BartoszKP ohkay... whats exactly wrong here? –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 10:27
    
@Fendy nooo.... –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 10:28
1  
@Mahesha999 What's wrong is forcing the usage of singleton here. What your really have here is an abstract factory pattern, not singleton. –  BartoszKP Dec 9 '13 at 12:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As BartoszKP mentions in the comments, you would probably be better of with a factory pattern here.

If you are interested in having a common place for events you could place that event in the factory class, or implement a static event in the Listener class.

public class ListenerFactory {

    public IListener CreateListener(URI uri, int port) {
        Listener l = new Listener();
        l.MessageReceived += OnMessageReceived;
        // do whatever with l. loop until connection, or use l.Start() for instance
        return l;
    }

    public static event EventHandler<MessageEventArgs> ListenerMessageReceived;

    private static void OnMessageReceived(object sender, MessageEventArgs e) {
        // trigger ListenerMessageReceived
    }
}

public interface IListener {
    event EventHandler<MessageEventArgs> MessageReceived;
    void Send(byte[] data);
}

public class Listener : IListener {
    // implement interface
}

Then you just call new ListenerFactory().Create(host, port); when you need a new Listener, and if you want to listen for all messages, you subscribe to ListenerFactory.MessageReceived for incoming messages.

Using this pattern, you can create several connections at once instead of relying on one class to handle all of them.


You should move the initialization code of httpListener to its own method in order to avoid recreating listener. By doing that, and adding a property for getting the listener instance, classes can use Listener.Instance.Start() to reconnect if the static constructor fails to connect.

public class Listener
{
    private static Listener listener = null;  //singleton instance

    //member variables
    private HttpListener httpListener = null;
    private int port = -1;

    static Listener()
    {
        listener = new Listener();
        // start listener
        try {
             listener.Start();
         }
         catch { }
    }

    // Use this method in other classes to start listener if it fails
    // in static constructor
    public static Listener Instance { get { return listener; } }

    private Listener()
    {
    }

     public bool IsConnected {
         get { return httpListener != null; }
     }

     public void Start() 
     {
        if (IsConnected) { return; }
        try
        {
            port = //randomly generate
            httpListener = new HttpListener();
            //start listening
        }   
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            //cant listen on randomly chosen port
        httpListener = null;
            port = -1;
            return;            
        }   
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
hey u set httpListener to null. Shouldnt I be setting listener to null. Or its just that we should never set static instance to null? –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 11:02
    
Yes, the static instance is never set to null, you only update the instance variable httpListener –  Patrick Dec 9 '13 at 11:04
    
Why its bad idea to nullify static singleton? –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 11:23
    
static object may be used in many places inside the project. When the static object is set to null, and other code use it, it can cause exception. It can causing race condition and make it harder to debug (finding the cause where the object set to null). –  Fendy Dec 9 '13 at 11:31
    
For instance, the following code will cause issues: Listener l = Listener.Instance; l.DoSomething(); If the static instance is set to null between the calls, you could end up with a state you don't want, i.e. a "loose variable" since the variable l is stored in a local state outside the control of the Listener class. –  Patrick Dec 9 '13 at 12:20

The immediate problem is that on failure the instance constructor is setting the static member listener to null. However, control then returns to the static constructor which sets the static member listener to the object that was created in the instance constructor. Hence, the behaviour you're seeing.

I'd argue that your (instance) constructor is trying to do too much. I would move the 'start listening' logic into a separate method and call that from anywhere other than the instance constructor. That will make your error handling a little easier e.g.

class Listener
{
    public static Listener listener = null;  //singleton instance

    //member variables
    private HttpListener httpListener = null;
    private int port = -1;

    static Listener GetListener()
    {
        if (listener != null)
        {
            return listener;
        }

        try
        {
            listener = new Listener();
            listener.StartListening();
            return listener;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            //cant listen on randomly chosen port
            listener.Cleanup();
            listener = null;
            throw;
        }
    }

    private Listener()
    {
        port = RandomlyGenerate();
        httpListener = new HttpListener();
    }

    private void StartListening()
    {
        //start listening
    }

    private void Cleanup()
    {
        httpListener.Close();
        httpListener = null;
        port = -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So this must also contain something static Listener getListener() and I have to do Listener.getListener().StartListening() ? –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 10:58
    
Yup. I've replaced the static constructor with a static GetListener() which is better. The above code is illustrative e.g. it's not thread safe, GetListener() could try listening on more than one port until it finds one that works and it's probably not necessary to cleanup the HttpListener on every attempt. –  StevieB Dec 9 '13 at 11:20
    
But what about nullifying listener? Or why its bad idea to nullify static singleton? –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 11:27
    
Your main use case is something like Listener.GetListener().DoSomething. However, if GetListener() returns null, then you'll get a null reference exception when the system tries to call DoSomething(). This would entail checking the return value of GetListener() every time which is not the greatest of designs. –  StevieB Dec 9 '13 at 11:43
    
Ohkay I have thought this: have void init() which will create httpListener and port and then start listening. I will call listener.init() inside static EwsListener() that way I dont have to attach listener. everywhere, also will not need to explicitly call init(), also I will not set listener = null, so that getListener() will always return instance. –  Mahesha999 Dec 9 '13 at 11:59

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