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For some ddl files containing a specific pattern I need the full path and filename. I am using the command: find /opt/releases/packages/cr666/sas/dbms -name *.ddl | xargs egrep -i -w "RENAME|MODIFY|^DROP TABLE"

In case of more than 1 found files, it returns what I need:

/opt/releases/packages/cr666/sas/dbms/sti/FA_BASKET.ddl:RENAME COLUMN;
/opt/releases/packages/cr666/sas/dbms/sti/FA_DISCLOSURE.ddl:MODIFY QUANTITY NUMBER;

However, If only 1 file is found it returns only the found line:

find /opt/releases/packages/cr_c_cr6/sas/dbms -name \*.ddl | xargs egrep -i -w "RENAME|MODIFY|^DROP TABLE"
alter table FA_DISCLOSURE MODIFY (ULINSTRUMENTID VARCHAR2(30 CHAR));

I am aware that if I use the option "-l" I get the result I need, but without the found line. Is there a way to get the same output for the second command as in the first example?

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Thanks a lot. The -H option did the trick. About the squeezing with exec, sorry but I don't like it. squeezing code is making it harder to read and to maintain. –  Marco B. Dec 9 '13 at 14:33
    
Good to read that. Since you're new here, please don't forget to mark the answer accepted if your problem is already solved. You can do it clicking on the check mark beside the answer to toggle it from hollow to green. See Help Center > Asking if you have any doubt! –  fedorqui Dec 10 '13 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Add the -H option of grep;

find ... | xargs egrep -iHw "RENAME|MODIFY|^DROP TABLE"
                         ^

From man grep:

-H, --with-filename

Print the file name for each match. This is the default when there is more than one file to search.


Also, note that the find .. | xargs egrep can be squeezed by using -exec in find as follows:

find $path -name *.ddl -exec egrep -iHw "RENAME|MODIFY|^DROP TABLE" {} \;
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If your grep doesn't accept the "-H" option, just search in "/dev/null" as well - it doesn't take long and it'll never find anything in there ;-)

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