Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

JavaFX is a new technology introduced by Sun. I would like to know what are the limitations and pitfalls of JavaFX and silverlight.........

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by casperOne Apr 6 '12 at 18:02

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I think you should ask something like "What are the limitations or pitfalls I should look out for in JavaFx?". –  o.k.w Jan 12 '10 at 7:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The main problems I see with JavaFX are:

  • It is very immature technology. While everything, as others have noted, must have a start somewhere, JavaFX is very immature technology in a field that has several more mature competitors. That makes all the difference. Flex/AIR and Silverlight are out there already and in active use all over the place. To tackle an entrenched market you need tools that are far superior to what's out there, not just a little superior (if at all).
  • It is stacked on top of the rather large JRE. The JRE is available on every major platform (and many minor ones) but it is not ubiquitously installed. The same is true of Flex/AIR and Silverlight, of course, but Flash is a lighter-weight solution than the whole JRE+JavaFX and the latter is basically a default on the target platform anyway.
  • JavaFX is heavily reliant upon the huge infrastructure that surrounds Java. This is a strength, of course, given that if you need it there's a library for it somewhere, but it is also a weakness in that it involves even more bloat than the JRE+JavaFX and starts to introduce you to the wonderful world of JAR Hell.
  • The final reason to be wary of JavaFX: I prefer it to all of the other currently available RIA technology. (Yes, despite my critiques, I like it better.) If I like something, it is guaranteed to fail. Computing technology is positively littered with technologies I preferred over what was eventually chosen by the market. My liking something is a kiss of death for it.

One of those may not have been entirely serious....

share|improve this answer

Here is a description of JavaFX disadvantages taken from this website (which also gives JavaFX advantages as well)

JavaFX's lack of maturity is, at the moment, its weak point. For example, it is lacking a lot of JavaFX-native controls (for example, a tree control). Now, it is quite straight-forward to wrap Swing controls and subsequently use them in a JavaFX-project but it's obvious that that is a bit of a temporary measure. Sun has mentioned that they will address this issue in future versions.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Personally, i don't consider the maturity a weakness. Everything has to have a beginning. It's biggest weakness is Flash's dominance and Flex's head-start. But i've dove into lots of JavaFX and Flex over the past six+ months and JavaFX is my choice should a winner have to be decided (which it doesn't. They can both play a role.) –  nicerobot Jan 17 '10 at 17:17

JavaFX is a software platform for creating and delivering rich Internet applications that can run across a wide variety of connected devices. The current release (JavaFX 1.2, June 2009) enables building applications for desktop, browser and mobile phones. TV set-top boxes, gaming consoles, Blu-ray players and other platforms are planned.

Disadvantages: Disadvantages: JavaFX's lack of maturity is, at the moment, its weak point. For example, it is lacking a lot of JavaFX-native controls (for example, a tree control). Now, it is quite straight-forward to wrap Swing controls and subsequently use them in a JavaFX-project but it's obvious that that is a bit of a temporary measure. Sun has mentioned that they will address this issue in future versions.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.