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I want to assign a single value to a part of a list. Is there a better solution to this than one of the following?

Maybe most performant but somehow ugly:

>>> l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]
>>> for i in range(2,len(l)): l[i] = None

>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

Concise (but I don't know if Python recognizes that no rearrangement of the list elements is necesssary):

>>> l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]
>>> l[2:] = [None]*(len(l)-2)
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

Same caveat like above:

>>> l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]
>>> l[2:] = [None for _ in range(len(l)-2)]
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

Not sure if using a library for such a trivial task is wise:

>>> import itertools
>>> l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]
>>> l[2:] = itertools.repeat(None,len(l)-2)
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

The problem that I see with the assignment to the slice (vs. the for loop) is that Python maybe tries to prepare for a change in the length of "l". After all, changing the list by inserting a shorter/longer slice involves copying all elements (that is, all references) of the list AFAIK. If Python does this in my case too (although it is unnecessary), the operation becomes O(n) instead of O(1) (assuming that I only always change a handful of elements).

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1  
Although it is not an answer, I think you can make your Concise version more readable like this: l[2:] = [None]*len(l[2:]. Just a poor suggestion :) – Paulo Bu Dec 9 '13 at 15:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think there's no straight out of the box feature in Python to do this. I like your second approach, but keep in mind that there's a tradeoff between space and time. This is a very good reading recommended by @user4815162342: Python Patterns - An Optimization Anecdote.

Anyhow, if this is an operation you'll be performing eventually in your code, I think your best option is to wrap it inside a helper function:

def setvalues(lst, index=0, value=None):
    for i in range(index, len(lst)):
        lst[i] = value

>>>l=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>>setvalues(l,index=2)
>>>l
>>>[1, 2, None, None, None]

This has some advantages:

  1. The code is refactored inside a function, so easy to modify if you change your mind about how to perform the action.
  2. You can have several functions that accomplish the same target and therefore can measure their performance.
  3. You can write tests for them.
  4. Every other advantage you can get by refactoring :)

Since IMHO there's no straight Python future for this action, this is the best workaround I can imagine.

Hope this helps!

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Wasn't xrange being eaten by the Python Titans in 3.0? – Vroomfondel Dec 9 '13 at 17:20
    
@Vroomfondel thanks for the heads up! I just wanted to improve its performance. Changing it right now :) – Paulo Bu Dec 9 '13 at 18:11
1  
In Python 3, xrange is simply spelled range. It is unfortunate that range also exists in Python 2, which means that the above code works on both, but with subtle differences in behavior. In general, since the two are not compatible, one must decide whether the code targets Python 2 or Python 3. – user4815162342 Dec 10 '13 at 10:14
    
Also, this implementation is guaranteed to be less efficient than a slice assignment, since you are looping over the list elements/indices in Python. – user4815162342 Dec 10 '13 at 10:14
1  
@user4815162342: That was a very nice reading. I'll remove my suggestion of performance and instead I'll point to that article. Thanks again. – Paulo Bu Dec 10 '13 at 16:27

Timing it:

python -mtimeit "l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]" "for i in range(2,len(l)):" "    l[i] = None"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.669 usec per loop

python -mtimeit "l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]" "l[2:] = [None]*(len(l)-2)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.419 usec per loop

python -mtimeit "l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]" "l[2:] = [None for _ in range(len(l)-2)]"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.655 usec per loop

python -mtimeit "l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]" "l[2:] = itertools.repeat(None,len(l)-2)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.997 usec per loop

Looks like l[2:] = [None]*(len(l)-2) is the best of the options you provided (for the scope you are dealing with).

Note:

Keep in mind that results will vary based on Python version, operation system, other currently running programs, and most of all - the size of the list and of the slice to be replaced. For larger scopes probably the last option (using itertools.repeat) will be the most effective, being both easily readable (pythonic) and efficient (performance).

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2  
Your benchmark holds for small lists. As l grows larger, it takes more time to allocate and free the temporary list, and the solution based on itertools.repeat becomes comparatively cheaper. To test this, replace the list setup with l = range(6), and increase the list. It takes a surprisingly large list for itertools.repeat to become faster, but it does happen — on my system, on a list with hundreds of thousands of elements. – user4815162342 Dec 9 '13 at 16:25
    
@user4815162342 Absolutely - There is no doubt about that. This answer is simply timing all the options the OP provided. – Inbar Rose Dec 9 '13 at 16:33
1  
That is precisely my point - timing all the options on a contrived data set is a crucial tool, but it does not replace performance analysis. The final sentence of your answer, on the other hand, leaves the reader with the impression that the provided timing is sufficient basis to decide on the best option. – user4815162342 Dec 9 '13 at 16:51

All of your solutions are Pythonic and about equally readable. If you really care about performance and think that it matters in this case, use the timeit module to benchmark them.

Having said that, I would expect that the first solution is almost certainly not the most performant one because it iterates over the list elements in Python. Also, Python doesn't optimize away list the list created on the right-hand-side of assignment, but the list creation is extremely fast, and in most cases a small temporary list doesn't affect execution at all. Personally, for a short list I'd go with your second solution, and for a longer list I'd go with itertools.repeat().

Note that itertools doesn't really count as a "library", it comes with Python and is so often used that it is essentially part of the language.

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Being more Pythonic and being more performant are goals that can sometimes collide. So you're basically asking two questions. If you really need the performance: measure it and take the fastest. In all other cases just go with what is most readable, in other words what is most Pythonic (what is most readable/familiar to other Python programmers).

Personally I think your second solution is quite readable:

>>> l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]
>>> l[2:] = [None]*(len(l)-2)
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

The start of the second line immediately tells me that you're replacing a specific part of the values of the list.

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I'd suggest something like this:

>>> l = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> n = [None] * len(l)
>>> l[2:] = n[2:]
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

It looks pretty: no explicit loops, no 'if', no comparisons! At the cost of a 2N complexity! (or not?)

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2  
What if l contains 1000 items and OP wants to replace just last 10? In that case for changing just 10 items this will create a new list of 1000 items. – Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 9 '13 at 15:45
2  
Yep! It is not optimized... – Don Dec 9 '13 at 15:46

EDIT - Editing the original list now.

You forgot this one, (IMO, this one is more readable)

>>> l = [i if i < 2 else None for i in range(6)]
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

If preserving is necessary,

>>> l = range(6)
>>> l
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> l[:] = [l[i] if i < 2 else None
...              for i in range(len(l))]
>>> l
[0, 1, None, None, None, None]

Timed it, performance is roughly 2.5 times slower than what Inbar got as the fastest method.

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An improvement may be: l = [l[i] if i < 2 else None for i in range(len(l))]. This way it uses the elements on the list. – Paulo Bu Dec 9 '13 at 15:48
    
Your solution with timing: python -mtimeit "l=[0,1,2,3,4,5]" "[l[i] if i < 2 else None for i in range(len(l))]" 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.81 usec per loop So - not as good as the others. – Inbar Rose Dec 9 '13 at 15:50
2  
This is not equivalent to what OP is doing, if there are other references to l then they are not going to affected here. – Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 9 '13 at 15:56
    
Hmm, yup @AshwiniChaudhary. Thanks for pointing out, editing to warn for that. – Ashish Nitin Patil Dec 9 '13 at 16:02

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