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I am working on a legacy framework. Lets say 'A' is the base-class and 'B' is the derived class. Both the classes do some critical framework initialization. FWIW, it uses ACE library heavily.

I have a situation wherein; an instance of 'B' is created. But the ctor of 'A' depends on some initialization that can only be performed from 'B'.

As we know when 'B' is instantiated the ctor for 'A' is invoked before that of 'B'. The virtual mechanism dosen't work from ctors, using static functions is ruled-out (due to static-initialization-order-fiasco).

I considered using the CRTP pattern as follows :-

template<class Derived>
class A {
public:
  A(){
    static_cast<Derived*>(this)->fun();
  }
};

class B : public A<B> {
public:
  B() : a(0) {
    a = 10;
  }
  void fun() { std::cout << "Init Function, Variable a = " << a << std::endl; }
private:
  int a;
};

But the class members that are initialized in the initializer list have undefined values as they are not yet executed (f.e. 'a' in the above case). In my case there a number of such framework-based initialization variables.

Are there any well-known patterns to handle this situation?

Thanks in advance,


Update:

Based on the idea given by dribeas, i conjured-up a temporary solution to this problem (a full-fledged refactoring does not fit my timelines for now). The following code will demonstrate the same:-

// move all A's dependent data in 'B' to a new class 'C'.
class C {
public:
   C() : a(10)
   {  }
   int getA() { return a; }
private:
   int a;

};

// enhance class A's ctor with a pointer to the newly split class
class A {
public:
   A(C* cptr)
   {
     std::cout << "O.K. B's Init Data From C:- " << cptr->getA() <<
std::endl;
   }

};

// now modify the actual derived class 'B' as follows
class B : public C, public A {
public:
   B()
     : A(static_cast<C*>(this))
   { }

}; 

For some more discussion on the same see this link on c.l.c++.m. There is a nice generic solution given by Konstantin Oznobikhin.

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2  
That is UB (undefined behavior) and a rather nasty trick to play on the compiler. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 12 '10 at 8:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Probably the best thing you can do is refactoring. It does not make sense to have a base class depend on one of its derived types.

I have seen this done before, providing quite some pain to the developers: extend the ACE_Task class to provide a periodic thread that could be extended with concrete functionality and activating the thread from the periodic thread constructor only to find out that while in testing and more often than not it worked, but that in some situations the thread actually started before the most derived object was initialized.

Inheritance is a strong relationship that should be used only when required. If you take a look at the boost thread library (just the docs, no need to enter into detail), or the POCO library you will see that they split the problem in two: thread classes control thread execution and call a method that is passed to them in construction: the thread control is separated from the actual code that will be runned, and the fact that the code to be run is received as an argument to the constructor guarantees that it was constructed before the thread constructor was called.

Maybe you could use the same approach in your own code. Divide the functionality in two, whatever the derived class is doing now should be moved outside of the hierarchy (boost uses functors, POCO uses interfaces, use whatever seems to fit you most). Without a better description of what you are trying to do, I cannot really go into more detail.

Another thing you could try (this is fragile and I would recommend against) is breaking the B class into a C class that is independent of A and a B class that inherits from both, first from C then from A (with HUGE warning comments there). This will guarantee that C will be constructed prior to A. Then make the C subobject an argument of A (through an interface or as a template argument). This will probably be the fastest hack, but not a good one. Once you are willing to modify the code, just do it right.

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Thanks for the suggestions. Looks like a major refactoring exercise in store for me. –  Abhay Jan 12 '10 at 9:56
    
@dribeas: You not only understood the real-production-code related issue (unlike some thinking it as a silly question), also provided good suggestions one of which i have used for my temporary fix. So i am accepting this as an answer. Thanks. –  Abhay Jan 13 '10 at 15:02
    
Glad it helped. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 13 '10 at 17:02

First, I think your design is bad if the constructor of a base class depends on the something done in the constructor in a derived. It really shouldn't be that way. At the time the constructor of the base class run, the object of the derived class basically doesn't exist.

A solution might be to have a helper object passed from the derived class to the constructor of the base class.

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It cannot help it! Its a 'legacy' aplication framework. I have considered the helper object approach as well, but in my case it's too much work. Lets see if we find any better alternatives. Thanks –  Abhay Jan 12 '10 at 8:23

Perhaps Lazy Initialization does it for you. Store a flag in A, wether it's initialized or not. Whenever you call a method, check for the flag. if it's false, initialize A (the ctor of B has been run then) and set the flag to true.

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It is a bad design and as already said it is UB. Please consider moving such dependencies to some other method say 'initialize' and call this initialize method from your derived class constructor (or anywhere before you actually need the base class data to be initialized)

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Hmm. So, if I'm reading into this correctly, "A" is part of the legacy code, and you're pretty damn sure the right answer to some problem is to use a derived class, B.

It seems to me that the simplest solution might be to make a functional (non-OOP) style static factory function;

static B& B::makeNew(...);

Except that you say you run into static initialization order fiasco? I wouldn't think you would with this kind of setup, since there's no initialization going on.

Alright, looking at the problem more, "C" needs to have some setup done by "B" that "A" needs done, only "A" gets first dibs, because you want to have inheritance. So... fake inheritance, in a way that lets you control construction order...?

class A
{
    B* pB;
public:
    rtype fakeVirtual(params) { return pB->fakeVirtual(params); }

    ~A()
    {
        pB->deleteFromA();
        delete pB;
        //Deletion stuff
    }

protected:
    void deleteFromB()
    {
        //Deletion stuff
        pB = NULL;
    }
}

class B
{
    A* pA;
public:
    rtype fakeInheritance(params) {return pA->fakeInheritance(params);}

    ~B()
    {
        //deletion stuff
        pA->deleteFromB();
    }

protected:
    friend class A;
    void deleteFromA()
    {
        //deletion stuff
        pA = NULL;
    }
}

While it's verbose, I think this should safely fake inheritance, and allow you to wait to construct A until after B has done it's thing. It's also encapsulated, so when you can pull A you shouldn't have to change anything other than A and B.

Alternatively, you may also want to take a few steps back and ask yourself; what is the functionality that inheritance gives me that I am trying to use, and how might I accomplish that via other means? For instance, CRTP can be used as an alternative to virtual, and policies an alternative to function inheritance. (I think that's the right phrasing of that). I'm using these ideas above, just dropping the templates b/c I'm only expecting A to template on B and vice versa.

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