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I have this method in my app to check internet.

/*
 Connectivity testing code pulled from Apple's Reachability Example: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#samplecode/Reachability
 */
-(BOOL)hasConnectivity {
    struct sockaddr_in zeroAddress;
    bzero(&zeroAddress, sizeof(zeroAddress));
    zeroAddress.sin_len = sizeof(zeroAddress);
    zeroAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;

    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithAddress(kCFAllocatorDefault, (const struct sockaddr*)&zeroAddress);
    if(reachability != NULL) {
        //NetworkStatus retVal = NotReachable;
        SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
        if (SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags)) {
            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsReachable) == 0)
            {
                // if target host is not reachable
                return NO;
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionRequired) == 0)
            {
                // if target host is reachable and no connection is required
                //  then we'll assume (for now) that your on Wi-Fi
                return YES;
            }


            if ((((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnDemand ) != 0) ||
                 (flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsConnectionOnTraffic) != 0))
            {
                // ... and the connection is on-demand (or on-traffic) if the
                //     calling application is using the CFSocketStream or higher APIs

                if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsInterventionRequired) == 0)
                {
                    // ... and no [user] intervention is needed
                    return YES;
                }
            }

            if ((flags & kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN) == kSCNetworkReachabilityFlagsIsWWAN)
            {
                // ... but WWAN connections are OK if the calling application
                //     is using the CFNetwork (CFSocketStream?) APIs.
                return YES;
            }
        }
    }

    return NO;
}

I have to paste this method on every class and check for internet like this

if([self hasConnectivity] == YES){

I want to put this method at a single class, like I do put Macros in Constants.h or .pch file.

Is there any way (Other than delegate, as I don't want to use delegate that much) to do so.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change -(BOOL)hasConnectivity to +(BOOL)hasConnectivity (this turns an instance method into a class method). Add it to a class called, let's say, Reachability. Add Reachability.h to you .pch. Now call [Reachability hasConnectivity] and check its return value from anywhere in your app. Boom.

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Can I add this to Constants.h, which has no .m file ???? –  Duaan Dec 9 '13 at 17:07
    
Yes, you can add Reachability.h to Constants.h as long as you import Constants.h in the classes where you want to call [Reachability hasConnectivity]. –  neilco Dec 9 '13 at 17:08

You could add that method as category for NSObject, so it will be available for all of your classes. So you could create a category named Network for NSObject, for example:

//NSObject+Network.h
@interface NSObject (Network)
-(BOOL)hasConnectivity;
@end


// NSObject+Network.m
@implementation NSObject (Network)
-(BOOL)hasConnectivity {
    ...
}
@end

import NSObject+Network.h in your .pch and, boom, in all your classes you can access to hasConnectivity.

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