Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i am new to Haskell and i am having a hard time with reading text and numbers from a file. i am trying to make a program that reads a lot of numbers and text and compares them, and i would like to know how can i read them into a list , so it would be easier to compare them, i think...

let's say i have a file with the following content:

File 1:
  Bill 9176
  Tom 9183
  Steve 4353

and i want to read the name and the number into a list, how can i do that ?


When i try to compile this code,

import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.String

parseNameNumber :: Parser (String, Integer)
parseNameNumber = do
spaces
name <- many1 letter
space
number <- fmap read $ many1 digit
return (name, number)

parseFile :: String -> IO ()
parseFile = do
result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline)
case result of
Left err  -> print err
Right res -> print res  

it gives me these errors:

Couldn't match type `IO ()' with `String -> IO ()'
Expected type: IO (Either a0 a1)
               -> (Either a0 a1 -> IO ()) -> String -> IO ()
  Actual type: IO (Either a0 a1)
               -> (Either a0 a1 -> IO ()) -> IO ()
In a stmt of a 'do' block:
  result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline)
In the expression:
  do { result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline);
       case result of {
         Left err -> print err
         Right res -> print res } }
In an equation for `parseFile':
    parseFile
      = do { result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline);
             case result of {
               Left err -> print err
               Right res -> print res } }

file.hs:14:13:
Couldn't match expected type `IO (Either a0 a1)'
            with actual type `String
                              -> IO (Either ParseError [(String, Integer)])'
In the return type of a call of `parseFromFile'
Probable cause: `parseFromFile' is applied to too few arguments
In a stmt of a 'do' block:
  result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline)
In the expression:
  do { result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline);
       case result of {
         Left err -> print err
         Right res -> print res } }
share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps you should start by learning some basic Haskell. E.g. read this book learnyouahaskell.com – Roman Cheplyaka Dec 9 '13 at 18:08
    
@RomanCheplyaka i know how to read with getContents, but what i don't know is how i can read the data into tupples – user3028943 Dec 9 '13 at 18:11
    
What have you tried? If you can get the contents with getContents, how do you separate that into lines? (hint: type :type lines into GHCi). Once you have each line, how do you convert that line into words? (hint: type :type words into GHCi). – bheklilr Dec 9 '13 at 18:41
    
The long error message is because you are missing the filename argument to parseFromFile. (There's a suggestion about that in the error message.) – Ørjan Johansen Dec 11 '13 at 4:02

Look at your data.

"Bill 9176" :: String

Now back to your tuple

("Bill", 9176) :: (String, Int)

Now back to your data. Sadly it isn't a tuple. But with some pure functions it could be the type you desire. Look down, back up. Where are you? You're in front a computer screen running vim in terminal. What's the type of read ?

read :: Read a => a

Back at the String. You can split the string with words.

words :: String -> [String]

Anything is possible when your functions are data and your data is functions. I'm in a monad.

parseLine :: String -> (String, Int)
parseLine xs = (\(n:i:_) -> (n, read i)) (words xs)
share|improve this answer
1  
"But it could become a tuple if it used pure functions" if you want to stick to the oldspice theme :) – jozefg Dec 9 '13 at 18:44
    
So basically if i want to read a file and just not one tuple, how can i adapt this function? – user3028943 Dec 11 '13 at 12:24

It sounds like your problem is parsing, not reading the file. I favor the Haskell library called Parsec for parsing. It can be installed with cabal install parsec. Then

import Text.Parsec
import Text.Parsec.String

parseNameNumber :: Parser (String, Integer)
parseNameNumber = do
  spaces
  name <- many1 letter
  space
  number <- fmap read $ many1 digit
  return (name, number)

parseFile :: String -> IO ()
parseFile s = do
  result <- parseFromFile (parseNameNumber `sepBy` newline) s
  case result of
    Left err  -> print err
    Right res -> print res

Of course this can be done by manipulating your strings with list operations and then applying read, but it's much less robust. Perhaps it's overkill, but I still will mention it as something that's worth learning.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm trying to compile your code, in order to try it out, but it gives me a lot of errors – user3028943 Dec 9 '13 at 19:55
    
@user3028943 Do you mind saying what those errors are? It compiles for me – jozefg Dec 9 '13 at 19:55
    
i put it in a new answer :) – user3028943 Dec 9 '13 at 20:37
    
@user3028943 Fixed – jozefg Dec 9 '13 at 20:40
    
@jozefg i'm sorry but if i want read something from a file using these program, how can i do it ? – user2878641 Dec 9 '13 at 20:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.