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I'm working on a project that uses a WCF Service as a router/load balancer for multiple "worker services." Basically, the router will keep track of how many jobs each worker service is working on, and will route new jobs to workers with the least load. I would like to be able to add/remove worker services/servers as necessary, and do not want to maintain a static list of these worker services. Each time a worker service is added or removed, it needs to "register" and "unregister" itself with the router.

This MSDN article briefly describes what I need to accomplish.

What I currently have, is a WCF Service that acts as a router:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IRouterService
{
    [OperationContract]
    bool RegisterWorker(WorkerService worker);
    [OperationContract]
    bool UnregisterWorker(WorkerService worker);
}

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single, ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Multiple)]
public class RouterService : IRouterService
{
    List<WorkerService> workers = new List<WorkerService>(); //keeps track of worker services

    public bool RegisterWorker(WorkerService worker)
    {
        bool isSuccess = false;
        if (workerService.IsValid() && !workers.Any(w => w.EndpointUri == worker.EndpointUri))
        {
            workers.Add(worker);
            isSuccess = true;
        }
        return isSuccess;
    }

    public bool UnregisterWorker(WorkerService worker)
    {
        bool isSuccess = false;
        if (workers.contains(worker))
        {
            workers.Remove(worker);
            isSuccess = true;
        }
        return isSuccess;
    }
}

This "router service" has public methods that the worker services call to Register() and Unregister() themselves as necessary. The problem that I am running into is that I would like for my worker services to be InstanceContextMode.PerCall, which does not allow me to simply call the router's registration service in the worker service's constructor (as the constructor would get called for each call to the service, which won't work for me). I could define the worker services as InstanceContextMode.Single, but this means I'd need to write logic to handle multiple threads (rather than just relying on WCF to spawn/manage as many threads as necessary using the PerCall context mode).

Thoughts? Is there a way that I can call the router's Register() method only once when a worker service first comes online, or do I need to use a singleton approach, and handle threading myself?

Let me know if something doesn't make sense, and I'll try to clarify.

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1 Answer 1

Based on a brief reviewed of your scenario, I think you may want to give some consideration of the .Net Routing Service.

The Routing Service is a generic SOAP intermediary that acts as a message router. The core functionality of the Routing Service is the ability to route messages based on message content, which allows a message to be forwarded to a client endpoint based on a value within the message itself, in either the header or the message body. The RoutingService is implemented as a Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) service in the System.ServiceModel.Routing namespace.

While this does not directly address your issue, I can say from experience that our team has had positive results with the routing service.

Regards,

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't the routing service only allow you to route messages based on their content? While I will have to filter/route based on content (get the right message to the right type of service), what I'm more concerned about right now is being able to load balance by sending messages of the same type to one of several worker services. –  Patrick McCaffrey Dec 9 '13 at 22:36
    
The following article provides a good read about the Routing Service and load balancing. The article states, in part, that "Overall, this is a much more pleasing implementation of RoundRobin, and could easily be extended to other load balancing patterns as well. It has the distinction of being 1) quite small, 2) easy to understand (especially compared to the other implementations) 3) thread safe, and 4) performant" blogs.msdn.com/b/routingrules/archive/2010/04/14/… –  Seymour Dec 9 '13 at 23:23
    
For the record, I ended up going with the singleton approach. The Routing Service may be able to do what I need, but, from everything I've read, it is meant more for filtering messages to different types of services, whereas I need to do that, as well as load balance among a variable number of each service type. –  Patrick McCaffrey Dec 16 '13 at 15:34

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