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What is the translation of this code to C, more exactly what 'foldl' does ?

I think this code may be Haskell, but I'm not quite sure.

foldl (\x y -> y:x) [] [1..42]
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To translate that to C code, first you need to decide on a representation for linked lists - what linked list do you wish to use? –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Dec 9 '13 at 18:21
    
This just reverses a list, in C that would probably be a singly-linked list. Do you need to reverse the list in place or create a new one? –  Lee Dec 9 '13 at 18:21
7  
I was thinking I'd write this in C on my lunch break, but—nope. I got to around 30 lines before getting bored. To even get that far I gave up on laziness, type parametricity, and immutability. It's safe to say that there is a LOT packed into that little line in terms of C. –  J. Abrahamson Dec 9 '13 at 18:52
    
In addition to the great descriptions below, check out learnyouahaskell.com/higher-order-functions –  Andrey Dec 9 '13 at 19:32
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2 Answers 2

It would be a fair amount of work to convert this short line into C, since it would require defining linked lists and working with pointers. Instead, I'll just attempt to explain with foldl does.

The foldl function in Haskell has the type foldl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> a. Here, a and b are type variables and can be any type, so long as you're consistent. Let's specialize it for the problem you're working on. First of all, we see that the list passed to foldl is [1..42], which has type [Int]. This fits into foldl as the [b] argument, so since [b] ~ [Int] (~ is the type equality symbol), we can deduce that b ~ Int. The second value passed to foldl is [], which in this case will have the type [Int], so a ~ [Int]. If we plug these back into the full type signature we get

foldl :: ([Int] -> Int -> [Int]) -> [Int] -> [Int] -> [Int]

So what about the lambda function (\x y -> y : x)? All it's doing is taking a list, an element, and prepending that element to the front of the list. An example would be

> let f = (\x y -> y : x)
> f [1, 2, 3] 0
[0, 1, 2, 3]
> f [] 1
[1]
> f (f [1, 2] 3) 4
[4, 3, 1, 2]

What foldl does with that function is call it repeatedly, feeding it values from the list. The [] as the second argument is the initial value. So on a short list, it would look like

foldl (\x y -> y : x) [] [1, 2, 3, 4]
  (\x y -> y : x) [] 1 = 1 : [] = [1]
foldl (\x y -> y : x) [1] [2, 3, 4]
  (\x y -> y : x) [1] 2 = 2 : [1] = [2, 1]
foldl (\x y -> y : x) [2, 1] [3, 4]
  (\x y -> y : x) [2, 1] 3 = 3 : [2, 1] = [3, 2, 1]
foldl (\x y -> y : x) [3, 2, 1] [4]
  (\x y -> y : x) [3, 2, 1] 4 = 4 : [3, 2, 1] = [4, 3, 2, 1]
foldl (\x y -> y : x) [4, 3, 2, 1] [] = [4, 3, 2, 1]

So this particular fold reverses a list.


An implementation in C that is specialized to only int linked lists (no polymorphism), no laziness, and no immutability would be

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct Node_
{
    int val;
    struct Node_ *next;
};

typedef struct Node_ Node;
typedef struct Node_ * NodePtr;

NodePtr mkNode(int val) {
    NodePtr n = (NodePtr) malloc(sizeof(Node));
    n->val = val;
    n->next = NULL;
    return n;
}

NodePtr reverse(NodePtr head) {
    NodePtr current = head;
    NodePtr newHead = mkNode(head->val);

    NodePtr temp;
    while (current->next != NULL) {
        temp = mkNode(current->next->val);
        current = current->next;
        temp->next = newHead;
        newHead = temp;
    }

    return newHead;
}


NodePtr fromTo(int start, int stop) {
    NodePtr root = mkNode(start);
    NodePtr conductor = root;
    NodePtr temp;
    while (++start <= stop) {
        temp = mkNode(start);
        conductor->next = temp;
        conductor = conductor->next;
    }
    return root;
}

void printNode(NodePtr root) {
    NodePtr copy = root;
    while (copy->next != NULL) {
        printf("%d ", copy->val);
        copy = copy->next;
    }
    printf("%d\n", copy->val);
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    NodePtr numbers = fromTo(1, 10);
    printNode(numbers);
    printNode(reverse(numbers));
    return 0;
}

Which clocks in at about 30 lines of actual implementation, and 60 lines for a functional example. As you can see, Haskell is much more expressive than C.


You could even write a specialized version of foldl in C and implement reverse with it:

NodePtr foldl_NodePtr(NodePtr (*func)(NodePtr, int), NodePtr initial, NodePtr root) {
    NodePtr val = initial;
    NodePtr copy = root;
    while (copy->next != NULL) {
        val = func(val, copy->val);
        copy = copy->next;
    }
    val = func(val, copy->val);
    return val;
}

NodePtr lambda(NodePtr node, int val) {
    NodePtr temp = mkNode(val);
    temp->next = node;
    return temp;
}

NodePtr reverse_foldl(NodePtr root) {
    NodePtr temp = mkNode(root->val);
    return foldl_NodePtr(lambda, temp, root->next);
}

And if you wanted to implement sum with a fold in C

int foldl_int(int (*func)(int, int), int initial, NodePtr root) {
    int val = initial;
    NodePtr copy = root;
    while (copy->next != NULL) {
        val = func(val, copy->val);
        copy = copy->next;
    }
    val = func(val, copy->val);
    return val;
}

int add(int x, int y) { return x + y; }

int sum(NodePtr root) { return foldl_int(add, 0, root); }

Which is surprisingly concise.

In case you missed this detail, in reverse_foldl we have to make the initial value an already populated node since this definition of a linked list doesn't support making empty lists, the equivalent of []. Instead, we create the first node, then pass in root->next to foldl.

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Hehehe, that's about how far I got too, but then I wanted to give it something resembling higher-order folding using a function pointer. Needless to say I gave up shortly into trying that. –  J. Abrahamson Dec 9 '13 at 21:42
1  
I avoided recursion for the same reason---without laziness it makes things more awkward here, but since it's a foldl it's not too bad. I had an implementation of foldl that was heavily specialized (essentially ([Int] -> Int -> [Int]) -> [Int] -> [Int] -> [Int]) and gave up the moment that void pointers popped into my head ;) –  J. Abrahamson Dec 9 '13 at 22:38
1  
@J.Abrahamson It isn't so much the laziness but the lack of tail recursion optimization that we lack in C. Since C doesn't support overloaded return types for functions, we have to write different implementations of foldl_type for each type we want to use. The easy way to do that consistently is to write a macro that implements the function itself and then pass in the necessary parameters to the macro. I made one for the recursive and normal versions, both are pretty simple but effective. –  bheklilr Dec 9 '13 at 22:45
1  
TCO would solve the recursion problem, too. The majority of the clunk is just general C boilerplate and the linked-list implementation. –  J. Abrahamson Dec 9 '13 at 22:53
1  
@bheklilr Since when doesn't the most common C compilers support TCO with -O2 or -O3? –  kqr Dec 10 '13 at 8:50
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You don't need C to understand Haskell. It is easy to visualize foldl's operation with some infix operator, let's call it *:

foldl (*) z [a,b,c,...,n] == (... (((z * a) * b) * c) * ...) * n

your function, (\x y -> y:x), is a cons (:) with its arguments flipped: flip (:) a b = b:a. So your foldl call becomes

  = n : (... : (c : (b : (a : []))) ...) 

which is just the reversal of the input list, [n,...,c,b,a], as is already described in the other answer.

There's also a right fold, foldr:

foldr (*) z [a,b,c,...,n] == a * (b * (c * (... * (n * z) ...)))

Try

> foldr (:) [] [1..42]
> let xs = foldr (:) xs [1..42] in take 50 xs
> let ys = foldl (flip (:)) ys [1..42] in take 50 $ drop 40 ys

etc.


But if you "must" write it in C, start by translating the input list, [1..42], as e.g.

// [1..42]

int a[42];
int i=0;
int n=1;
for( ; i<42; ++i)
{
    a[i] = n;
    n += 1;
}
int *p1 = &a[0];
int incr_1 = 1;

and then translate the foldl call:

// foldl (\x y -> y:x) [] [1..42]

int *p2 = &a[41];
int incr_2 = -1;

That's right, practically a no-op. Because of Haskell's purity (immutability) the same C object can be used to represent several Haskell objects. Only the addressing scheme needs to be adjusted. The same array a[42] can even be used to represent the circular lists, or any portion of them.

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