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I was hoping someone could explain to me why a function with a reference parameter would be called rather than one with a pointer parameter, given something like the following:

int Func1 ( int & a );
int Func1 ( int * a );

int main()
{
   int y = 1;
   int & x = y;
   int * z = & y;

   Func1(y); // Calls reference version
   Func1(&y); // Calls pointer version
   Func1(z); // Calls pointer version

   return 0;
}

int Func1 ( int & a )
{
    cout << "Reference param Func1 called" << endl;
    a = a + 1;

    return a + 1;
}

int Func1 ( int * a )
{
    cout << "Pointer param Func1 called" << endl;
    *a = *a + 1;

    return *a + 1;
}

I'm confused as to how the decision is made to call the pointer parameter version of Func1 for the Func1(&y) call rather than the reference parameter version of Func1. Also, why is the reference parameter version of Func1 not chosen for the Func1(z) call? If z holds an address, I don't see why the address can't be passed into the reference parameter for Func1( &a ).

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marked as duplicate by PlasmaHH, BoBTFish, Digital Chris, Mike, beny23 Feb 28 '14 at 15:48

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Its about the type, the type of z is a pointer. –  Barış Uşaklı Dec 9 '13 at 18:24
    
Ah, I see. So Func1( int & a ) creates a reference, it doesn't receive an address as a passed argument, whereas Func1( int * a ) receives an address as a passed argument, which can be of the form &y or z, where z is a pointer? –  Caulibrot Dec 9 '13 at 18:36
    
@Caulibrot: &y is a pointer. So it's an example of "z, where z is a pointer". –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '13 at 18:45
    
If &y is a pointer, is its scope as a pointer simply the time from when it's passed to when it's received? I know that y has local scope in main, but I'm not sure about when &y as a pointer is created and destroyed. –  Caulibrot Dec 9 '13 at 18:50
1  
@Caulibrot: &y is an rvalue of scalar type, meaning that it's a value without (as far as the standard is concerned) any particular location in memory. In this respect it's the same as the value that results from, say, y+1. It doesn't have a scope (because names have scope, objects and values don't). It doesn't really have a lifetime either, objects have lifetime. It's just the value used to initialize the variable a inside int Func1(int *a). The scope and duration of a, then, are both "until the call returns". –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '13 at 18:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

int Func1 ( int & a ); matches calls where the argument expression has type int (and is eligible to have a non-const reference taken to it). int Func1 ( int * a ); matches calls where the argument expression has type int*.

If z holds an address, I don't see why the address can't be passed into the reference parameter for Func1( &a ).

Well, you could achieve that by calling Func1(*z).

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