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Given two absolute paths, e.g.

/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat
/var/data

How can one create a relative path that uses the second path as its base? In the example above, the result should be: ./stuff/xyz.dat

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17 Answers 17

up vote 142 down vote accepted

It's a little roundabout, but why not use URI? It has a relativize method which does all the necessary checks for you.

String path = "/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat";
String base = "/var/data";
String relative = new File(base).toURI().relativize(new File(path).toURI()).getPath();
// relative == "stuff/xyz.dat"
share|improve this answer
1  
I didn't know about this method, before this post of yours. Thanks, +1. –  Adeel Ansari Jan 5 '09 at 6:52
10  
See Peter Mueller's answer. relativize() appears pretty broken for all but the simplest cases. –  Dave Ray Apr 21 '09 at 16:45
8  
Yep, it only works if the base path is a parent of the first path. If you need some hierarchical backward like "../../relativepath", it won't work. I found a solution: mrpmorris.blogspot.com/2007/05/… –  Aurélien Ribon Mar 11 '11 at 21:54

The Only 'Working' Solution (June 2010)

Apologies for the arrogant title, but I've spent almost the whole day investigating the other solutions posted here and none of them work. I want to draw attention to this solution in the hope that others will avoid wasting as much time as I have.

By 'work', I mean none of the other solutions pass my test cases. I'm can't guarantee that my solution is bug-free, but it does pass my test cases. The method and tests I've written are shown below. It depends on the FilenameUtils class from Apache commons IO.

Those of you fortunate enough to be using Java 5 (or higher) should consider replacing StringBuffer with StringBuilder.

import java.io.File;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

import org.apache.commons.io.FilenameUtils;

public class ResourceUtils {

    /**
     * Get the relative path from one file to another, specifying the directory separator. 
     * If one of the provided resources does not exist, it is assumed to be a file unless it ends with '/' or
     * '\'.
     * 
     * @param targetPath targetPath is calculated to this file
     * @param basePath basePath is calculated from this file
     * @param pathSeparator directory separator. The platform default is not assumed so that we can test Unix behaviour when running on Windows (for example)
     * @return
     */
    public static String getRelativePath(String targetPath, String basePath, String pathSeparator) {

        // Normalize the paths
        String normalizedTargetPath = FilenameUtils.normalizeNoEndSeparator(targetPath);
        String normalizedBasePath = FilenameUtils.normalizeNoEndSeparator(basePath);

        // Undo the changes to the separators made by normalization
        if (pathSeparator.equals("/")) {
            normalizedTargetPath = FilenameUtils.separatorsToUnix(normalizedTargetPath);
            normalizedBasePath = FilenameUtils.separatorsToUnix(normalizedBasePath);

        } else if (pathSeparator.equals("\\")) {
            normalizedTargetPath = FilenameUtils.separatorsToWindows(normalizedTargetPath);
            normalizedBasePath = FilenameUtils.separatorsToWindows(normalizedBasePath);

        } else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unrecognised dir separator '" + pathSeparator + "'");
        }

        String[] base = normalizedBasePath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator));
        String[] target = normalizedTargetPath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator));

        // First get all the common elements. Store them as a string,
        // and also count how many of them there are.
        StringBuffer common = new StringBuffer();

        int commonIndex = 0;
        while (commonIndex < target.length && commonIndex < base.length
                && target[commonIndex].equals(base[commonIndex])) {
            common.append(target[commonIndex] + pathSeparator);
            commonIndex++;
        }

        if (commonIndex == 0) {
            // No single common path element. This most
            // likely indicates differing drive letters, like C: and D:.
            // These paths cannot be relativized.
            throw new PathResolutionException("No common path element found for '" + normalizedTargetPath + "' and '" + normalizedBasePath
                    + "'");
        }   

        // The number of directories we have to backtrack depends on whether the base is a file or a dir
        // For example, the relative path from
        //
        // /foo/bar/baz/gg/ff to /foo/bar/baz
        // 
        // ".." if ff is a file
        // "../.." if ff is a directory
        //
        // The following is a heuristic to figure out if the base refers to a file or dir. It's not perfect, because
        // the resource referred to by this path may not actually exist, but it's the best I can do
        boolean baseIsFile = true;

        File baseResource = new File(normalizedBasePath);

        if (baseResource.exists()) {
            baseIsFile = baseResource.isFile();

        } else if (basePath.endsWith(pathSeparator)) {
            baseIsFile = false;
        }

        StringBuffer relative = new StringBuffer();

        if (base.length != commonIndex) {
            int numDirsUp = baseIsFile ? base.length - commonIndex - 1 : base.length - commonIndex;

            for (int i = 0; i < numDirsUp; i++) {
                relative.append(".." + pathSeparator);
            }
        }
        relative.append(normalizedTargetPath.substring(common.length()));
        return relative.toString();
    }


    static class PathResolutionException extends RuntimeException {
        PathResolutionException(String msg) {
            super(msg);
        }
    }    
}

The test cases that this passes are

public void testGetRelativePathsUnix() {
    assertEquals("stuff/xyz.dat", ResourceUtils.getRelativePath("/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat", "/var/data/", "/"));
    assertEquals("../../b/c", ResourceUtils.getRelativePath("/a/b/c", "/a/x/y/", "/"));
    assertEquals("../../b/c", ResourceUtils.getRelativePath("/m/n/o/a/b/c", "/m/n/o/a/x/y/", "/"));
}

public void testGetRelativePathFileToFile() {
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common\\sapisvr.exe";

    String relPath = ResourceUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals("..\\..\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf", relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathDirectoryToFile() {
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common\\";

    String relPath = ResourceUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals("..\\..\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf", relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathFileToDirectory() {
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\Fonts";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common\\foo.txt";

    String relPath = ResourceUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals("..\\..\\Boot\\Fonts", relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathDirectoryToDirectory() {
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common\\";
    String expected = "..\\..\\Boot";

    String relPath = ResourceUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals(expected, relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathDifferentDriveLetters() {
    String target = "D:\\sources\\recovery\\RecEnv.exe";
    String base = "C:\\Java\\workspace\\AcceptanceTests\\Standard test data\\geo\\";

    try {
        ResourceUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
        fail();

    } catch (PathResolutionException ex) {
        // expected exception
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this was exactly what I needed! –  Jeff Olson Apr 8 '11 at 15:36
    
Absolutely fantastic solution. Thanks for also including the test cases. I have not yet encountered a situation where your solution does not work correctly. –  RTBarnard Feb 17 '12 at 18:33
4  
Nice! One thing, though, it breaks if the base and target are the same - the string common is made to end in a separator, which the normalized target path doesn't have, so the substring call asks for one too many digits. Think I fixed it by adding the following before the last two lines of the function: if (common.length() >= normalizedTargetPath.length()) { return "."; } –  Erhannis Sep 21 '12 at 13:16
3  
Saying this is the only working solution is misleading. Other answers work better (this answer crashes when the base and target are the same), are simpler and don't rely on commons-io. –  NateS Oct 12 '13 at 8:27

Since Java 7 you can use the relativize method:

import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;

public class Test {

     public static void main(String[] args) {
        Path pathAbsolute = Paths.get("/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat");
        Path pathBase = Paths.get("/var/data");
        Path pathRelative = pathBase.relativize(pathAbsolute);
        System.out.println(pathRelative);
    }

}

Output:

stuff/xyz.dat
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice, short, no extra lib +1. Adam Crume's solution (hit 1) doesnt pass my tests and next answer (hit2) "The Only 'Working' Solution" adds a new jar AND is more code than my implementation, I find this here afterwards... better than never .-) –  hokr Jun 14 '13 at 4:23
    
I was about to publish it myself. I found the solution 5min ago. I tested it and it seems to work in all combination I found up to now. –  Rick-Rainer Ludwig Oct 26 '13 at 5:45
    
This is the solution if you use Java>=1.7 –  sc0p 6 hours ago

When using java.net.URI.relativize you should be aware of Java bug: JDK-6226081 (URI should be able to relativize paths with partial roots)

At the moment, the relativize() method of URI will only relativize URIs when one is a prefix of the other.

Which essentially means java.net.URI.relativize will not create ".."'s for you.

share|improve this answer
5  
Nasty. There is a workaround for this, apparently: stackoverflow.com/questions/204784/… –  skaffman Aug 17 '09 at 20:47

The bug referred to in @Peter Mueller's answer is addressed by URIUtils in Apache HttpComponents

public static URI resolve(URI baseURI,
                          String reference)

Resolves a URI reference against a base URI. Work-around for bug in java.net.URI ()

share|improve this answer

If you know the second string is part of the first:

String s1 = "/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat";
String s2 = "/var/data";
String s3 = s1.substring(s2.length());

or if you really want the period at the beginning as in your example:

String s3 = ".".concat(s1.substring(s2.length()));
share|improve this answer
    
It should also work for "/a/b/c", "/a/x/y" -> "../x/y" –  VoidPointer Oct 15 '08 at 14:17
2  
"/stuff/xyz.dat" is not a relative path... –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 15 '08 at 14:34
3  
String s3 = "." + s1.substring(s2.length()); is slightly more readable IMO –  Dónal Oct 15 '08 at 14:40

Recursion produces a smaller solution. This throws an exception if the result is impossible (e.g. different Windows disk) or impractical (root is only common directory.)

/**
 * Computes the path for a file relative to a given base, or fails if the only shared 
 * directory is the root and the absolute form is better.
 * 
 * @param base File that is the base for the result
 * @param name File to be "relativized"
 * @return the relative name
 * @throws IOException if files have no common sub-directories, i.e. at best share the
 *                     root prefix "/" or "C:\"
 */

public static String getRelativePath(File base, File name) throws IOException  {
    File parent = base.getParentFile();

    if (parent == null) {
        throw new IOException("No common directory");
    }

    String bpath = base.getCanonicalPath();
    String fpath = name.getCanonicalPath();

    if (fpath.startsWith(bpath)) {
        return fpath.substring(bpath.length() + 1);
    } else {
        return (".." + File.separator + getRelativePath(parent, name));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works good for me (Mac OS X file system), thanks! –  Pwdr Jun 20 '13 at 11:11
    
getCanonicalPath can be heavy weight, so this solution can be not recommended when you need to process hundred thousand records. For example I have some listing files having up to million records and now I want to move them to use relative path for portability. –  user2305886 Dec 27 '13 at 20:11

My version is loosely based on Matt and Steve's versions:

/**
 * Returns the path of one File relative to another.
 *
 * @param target the target directory
 * @param base the base directory
 * @return target's path relative to the base directory
 * @throws IOException if an error occurs while resolving the files' canonical names
 */
 public static File getRelativeFile(File target, File base) throws IOException
 {
   String[] baseComponents = base.getCanonicalPath().split(Pattern.quote(File.separator));
   String[] targetComponents = target.getCanonicalPath().split(Pattern.quote(File.separator));

   // skip common components
   int index = 0;
   for (; index < targetComponents.length && index < baseComponents.length; ++index)
   {
     if (!targetComponents[index].equals(baseComponents[index]))
       break;
   }

   StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
   if (index != baseComponents.length)
   {
     // backtrack to base directory
     for (int i = index; i < baseComponents.length; ++i)
       result.append(".." + File.separator);
   }
   for (; index < targetComponents.length; ++index)
     result.append(targetComponents[index] + File.separator);
   if (!target.getPath().endsWith("/") && !target.getPath().endsWith("\\"))
   {
     // remove final path separator
     result.delete(result.length() - File.separator.length(), result.length());
   }
   return new File(result.toString());
 }
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 works for me. Only minor correction: instead of "/".length() you should use separator.length –  leonbloy Mar 10 '11 at 22:25
    
@leonbloy: Fixed. Thank you! –  Gili Mar 11 '11 at 15:36

Actually my other answer didn't work if the target path wasn't a child of the base path.

This should work.

public class RelativePathFinder {

    public static String getRelativePath(String targetPath, String basePath, 
       String pathSeparator) {

    	// find common path
    	String[] target = targetPath.split(pathSeparator);
    	String[] base = basePath.split(pathSeparator);

    	String common = "";
    	int commonIndex = 0;
    	for (int i = 0; i < target.length && i < base.length; i++) {

    		if (target[i].equals(base[i])) {
    			common += target[i] + pathSeparator;
    			commonIndex++;
    		}
    	}


    	String relative = "";
    	// is the target a child directory of the base directory?
    	// i.e., target = /a/b/c/d, base = /a/b/
    	if (commonIndex == base.length) {
    		relative = "." + pathSeparator + targetPath.substring(common.length());
    	}
    	else {
    		// determine how many directories we have to backtrack
    		for (int i = 1; i <= commonIndex; i++) {
    			relative += ".." + pathSeparator;
    		}
    		relative += targetPath.substring(common.length());
    	}

    	return relative;
    }

    public static String getRelativePath(String targetPath, String basePath) {
    	return getRelativePath(targetPath, basePath, File.pathSeparator);
    }
}


public class RelativePathFinderTest extends TestCase {

    public void testGetRelativePath() {
    	assertEquals("./stuff/xyz.dat", RelativePathFinder.getRelativePath(
    			"/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat", "/var/data/", "/"));
    	assertEquals("../../b/c", RelativePathFinder.getRelativePath("/a/b/c",
    			"/a/x/y/", "/"));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
2  
Instead of File.pathSeparator should be File.separator. pathSeparator should use only for split (regex), as for "////" regex (win path regex), result path will be incorrect. –  Alex Ivasyuv Mar 29 '10 at 22:36

Matt B's solution gets the number of directories to backtrack wrong -- it should be the length of the base path minus the number of common path elements, minus one (for the last path element, which is either a filename or a trailing "" generated by split). It happens to work with /a/b/c/ and /a/x/y/, but replace the arguments with /m/n/o/a/b/c/ and /m/n/o/a/x/y/ and you will see the problem.

Also, it needs an else break inside the first for loop, or it will mishandle paths that happen to have matching directory names, such as /a/b/c/d/ and /x/y/c/z -- the c is in the same slot in both arrays, but is not an actual match.

All these solutions lack the ability to handle paths that cannot be relativized to one another because they have incompatible roots, such as C:\foo\bar and D:\baz\quux. Probably only an issue on Windows, but worth noting.

I spent far longer on this than I intended, but that's okay. I actually needed this for work, so thank you to everyone who has chimed in, and I'm sure there will be corrections to this version too!

public static String getRelativePath(String targetPath, String basePath, 
        String pathSeparator) {

    //  We need the -1 argument to split to make sure we get a trailing 
    //  "" token if the base ends in the path separator and is therefore
    //  a directory. We require directory paths to end in the path
    //  separator -- otherwise they are indistinguishable from files.
    String[] base = basePath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator), -1);
    String[] target = targetPath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator), 0);

    //  First get all the common elements. Store them as a string,
    //  and also count how many of them there are. 
    String common = "";
    int commonIndex = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < target.length && i < base.length; i++) {
        if (target[i].equals(base[i])) {
            common += target[i] + pathSeparator;
            commonIndex++;
        }
        else break;
    }

    if (commonIndex == 0)
    {
        //  Whoops -- not even a single common path element. This most
        //  likely indicates differing drive letters, like C: and D:. 
        //  These paths cannot be relativized. Return the target path.
        return targetPath;
        //  This should never happen when all absolute paths
        //  begin with / as in *nix. 
    }

    String relative = "";
    if (base.length == commonIndex) {
        //  Comment this out if you prefer that a relative path not start with ./
        //relative = "." + pathSeparator;
    }
    else {
        int numDirsUp = base.length - commonIndex - 1;
        //  The number of directories we have to backtrack is the length of 
        //  the base path MINUS the number of common path elements, minus
        //  one because the last element in the path isn't a directory.
        for (int i = 1; i <= (numDirsUp); i++) {
            relative += ".." + pathSeparator;
        }
    }
    relative += targetPath.substring(common.length());

    return relative;
}

And here are tests to cover several cases:

public void testGetRelativePathsUnixy() 
{        
    assertEquals("stuff/xyz.dat", FileUtils.getRelativePath(
            "/var/data/stuff/xyz.dat", "/var/data/", "/"));
    assertEquals("../../b/c", FileUtils.getRelativePath(
            "/a/b/c", "/a/x/y/", "/"));
    assertEquals("../../b/c", FileUtils.getRelativePath(
            "/m/n/o/a/b/c", "/m/n/o/a/x/y/", "/"));
}

public void testGetRelativePathFileToFile() 
{
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common\\sapisvr.exe";

    String relPath = FileUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals("..\\..\\..\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf", relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathDirectoryToFile() 
{
    String target = "C:\\Windows\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf";
    String base = "C:\\Windows\\Speech\\Common";

    String relPath = FileUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals("..\\..\\Boot\\Fonts\\chs_boot.ttf", relPath);
}

public void testGetRelativePathDifferentDriveLetters() 
{
    String target = "D:\\sources\\recovery\\RecEnv.exe";
    String base   = "C:\\Java\\workspace\\AcceptanceTests\\Standard test data\\geo\\";

    //  Should just return the target path because of the incompatible roots.
    String relPath = FileUtils.getRelativePath(target, base, "\\");
    assertEquals(target, relPath);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Two of your unit tests fail –  Dónal Jun 16 '10 at 9:40

Cool!! I need a bit of code like this but for comparing directory paths on Linux machines. I found that this wasn't working in situations where a parent directory was the target.

Here is a directory friendly version of the method:

 public static String getRelativePath(String targetPath, String basePath, 
     String pathSeparator) {

 boolean isDir = false;
 {
   File f = new File(targetPath);
   isDir = f.isDirectory();
 }
 //  We need the -1 argument to split to make sure we get a trailing 
 //  "" token if the base ends in the path separator and is therefore
 //  a directory. We require directory paths to end in the path
 //  separator -- otherwise they are indistinguishable from files.
 String[] base = basePath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator), -1);
 String[] target = targetPath.split(Pattern.quote(pathSeparator), 0);

 //  First get all the common elements. Store them as a string,
 //  and also count how many of them there are. 
 String common = "";
 int commonIndex = 0;
 for (int i = 0; i < target.length && i < base.length; i++) {
     if (target[i].equals(base[i])) {
         common += target[i] + pathSeparator;
         commonIndex++;
     }
     else break;
 }

 if (commonIndex == 0)
 {
     //  Whoops -- not even a single common path element. This most
     //  likely indicates differing drive letters, like C: and D:. 
     //  These paths cannot be relativized. Return the target path.
     return targetPath;
     //  This should never happen when all absolute paths
     //  begin with / as in *nix. 
 }

 String relative = "";
 if (base.length == commonIndex) {
     //  Comment this out if you prefer that a relative path not start with ./
     relative = "." + pathSeparator;
 }
 else {
     int numDirsUp = base.length - commonIndex - (isDir?0:1); /* only subtract 1 if it  is a file. */
     //  The number of directories we have to backtrack is the length of 
     //  the base path MINUS the number of common path elements, minus
     //  one because the last element in the path isn't a directory.
     for (int i = 1; i <= (numDirsUp); i++) {
         relative += ".." + pathSeparator;
     }
 }
 //if we are comparing directories then we 
 if (targetPath.length() > common.length()) {
  //it's OK, it isn't a directory
  relative += targetPath.substring(common.length());
 }

 return relative;
}
share|improve this answer

I'm assuming you have fromPath (an absolute path for a folder), and toPath (an absolute path for a folder/file), and your're looking for a path that with represent the file/folder in toPath as a relative path from fromPath (your current working directory is fromPath) then something like this should work:

public static String getRelativePath(String fromPath, String toPath) {

  // This weirdness is because a separator of '/' messes with String.split()
  String regexCharacter = File.separator;
  if (File.separatorChar == '\\') {
    regexCharacter = "\\\\";
  }

  String[] fromSplit = fromPath.split(regexCharacter);
  String[] toSplit = toPath.split(regexCharacter);

  // Find the common path
  int common = 0;
  while (fromSplit[common].equals(toSplit[common])) {
    common++;
  }

  StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer(".");

  // Work your way up the FROM path to common ground
  for (int i = common; i < fromSplit.length; i++) {
    result.append(File.separatorChar).append("..");
  }

  // Work your way down the TO path
  for (int i = common; i < toSplit.length; i++) {
    result.append(File.separatorChar).append(toSplit[i]);
  }

  return result.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

Lots of answers already here, but I found they didn't handle all cases, such as the base and target being the same. This function takes a base directory and a target path and returns the relative path. If no relative path exists, the target path is returned. File.separator is unnecessary.

public static String getRelativePath (String baseDir, String targetPath) {
    String[] base = baseDir.replace('\\', '/').split("\\/");
    targetPath = targetPath.replace('\\', '/');
    String[] target = targetPath.split("\\/");

    // Count common elements and their length.
    int commonCount = 0, commonLength = 0, maxCount = Math.min(target.length, base.length);
    while (commonCount < maxCount) {
        String targetElement = target[commonCount];
        if (!targetElement.equals(base[commonCount])) break;
        commonCount++;
        commonLength += targetElement.length() + 1; // Directory name length plus slash.
    }
    if (commonCount == 0) return targetPath; // No common path element.

    int targetLength = targetPath.length();
    int dirsUp = base.length - commonCount;
    StringBuffer relative = new StringBuffer(dirsUp * 3 + targetLength - commonLength + 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < dirsUp; i++)
        relative.append("../");
    if (commonLength < targetLength) relative.append(targetPath.substring(commonLength));
    return relative.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a solution other library free:

Path sourceFile = Paths.get("some/common/path/example/a/b/c/f1.txt");
Path targetFile = Paths.get("some/common/path/example/d/e/f2.txt"); 
Path relativePath = sourceFile.relativize(targetFile);
System.out.println(relativePath);

Outputs

..\..\..\..\d\e\f2.txt

[EDIT] actually it outputs on more ..\ because of the source is file not a directory. Correct solution for my case is:

Path sourceFile = Paths.get(new File("some/common/path/example/a/b/c/f1.txt").parent());
Path targetFile = Paths.get("some/common/path/example/d/e/f2.txt"); 
Path relativePath = sourceFile.relativize(targetFile);
System.out.println(relativePath);
share|improve this answer

Here a method that resolves a relative path from a base path regardless they are in the same or in a different root:

public static String GetRelativePath(String path, String base){

    final String SEP = "/";

    // if base is not a directory -> return empty
    if (!base.endsWith(SEP)){
        return "";
    }

    // check if path is a file -> remove last "/" at the end of the method
    boolean isfile = !path.endsWith(SEP);

    // get URIs and split them by using the separator
    String a = "";
    String b = "";
    try {
        a = new File(base).getCanonicalFile().toURI().getPath();
        b = new File(path).getCanonicalFile().toURI().getPath();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    String[] basePaths = a.split(SEP);
    String[] otherPaths = b.split(SEP);

    // check common part
    int n = 0;
    for(; n < basePaths.length && n < otherPaths.length; n ++)
    {
        if( basePaths[n].equals(otherPaths[n]) == false )
            break;
    }

    // compose the new path
    StringBuffer tmp = new StringBuffer("");
    for(int m = n; m < basePaths.length; m ++)
        tmp.append(".."+SEP);
    for(int m = n; m < otherPaths.length; m ++)
    {
        tmp.append(otherPaths[m]);
        tmp.append(SEP);
    }

    // get path string
    String result = tmp.toString();

    // remove last "/" if path is a file
    if (isfile && result.endsWith(SEP)){
        result = result.substring(0,result.length()-1);
    }

    return result;
}
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org.apache.ant has a FileUtils class with a getRelativePath method. Haven't tried it myself yet, but could be worthwhile to check it out.

http://javadoc.haefelinger.it/org.apache.ant/1.7.1/org/apache/tools/ant/util/FileUtils.html#getRelativePath(java.io.File, java.io.File)

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Psuedo-code:

  1. Split the strings by the path seperator ("/")
  2. Find the greatest common path by iterating thru the result of the split string (so you'd end up with "/var/data" or "/a" in your two examples)
  3. return "." + whicheverPathIsLonger.substring(commonPath.length);
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This answer is a hack at best. What about windows? –  Qix Dec 20 '12 at 3:09

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