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I am attempting to display my animated controls relative to the position of my form's header.

<div class="page-header container">

From within jQuery, I am trying to show messages with this function:

function showMessage(stype, title, message) {
  var position = $('.page-header container').offset.top;
  if (typeof position == 'undefined') {
    position = '50px';
    alert(position);
  } else {
    position = "'" + position + "px'";
  }
  $('.' + stype).animate({ top: position }, 500);
}

Every time I get alert('50px').

Since I am identifying with a CLASS instead of an ID, I thought I would try reading in the collection of all items in class '.page-header container':

function showMessage(stype, title, message) {
  var items = $('.page-header container');
  var position = items[0].offset.top;
  if (typeof position == 'undefined') {
    position = '50px';
    alert(position);
  } else {
    position = "'" + position + "px'";
  }
  $('.' + stype).animate({ top: position }, 500);
}

This time, it seems that items is undefined.

What have I overlooked?

share|improve this question
    
Change $('.page-header container') to $('.page-header .container') – Scottie Dec 9 '13 at 22:37
    
Why are you checking typeof something == 'undefined' here? When the variable is declared but uninitialized it's set to the language constant undefined . The typeof operator is to be used when the variable might not be declared. In general while I'm at this - avoid == and prefer === unless you have a very good reason. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 9 '13 at 22:37
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum: until T.J. fixed my problem below, typeof position was undefined. My question here was to find out why. – jp2code Dec 9 '13 at 22:42
    
@jp2code right, it was undefined but it was actually undefined and not undeclared. The typeof operator works on a value even if it was not declared (not just assigned to, but not even declared). So if you do var x; it's perfectly safe to do if(x===undefined). – Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 9 '13 at 22:44
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum: So, what is the preferred way to check that I CAUGHT something with [jQuery] and that I am not trying to assign with a null value? – jp2code Dec 9 '13 at 22:46
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Two problems with this line:

var position = $('.page-header container').offset.top;

First, it's looking for an element with the tag container within an element with the class page-header. The space indicates a descendant combinator. Second, offset is a function, not a property.

I think you meant:

var position = $('.page-header.container').offset().top;

That looks for an element that has both of the classes page-header and container, and calls offset (because it's a function), and then uses the top property of the object it returns.

share|improve this answer
    
That's amazing! I got this working after only your 3rd or 4th revision. :) – jp2code Dec 9 '13 at 22:39
    
Wow, I just upvoted this and it went from 0 to 7 :O That's a lot for a minute. Anyway - off topic aside this is probably what you want OP, and if you want a in a relation you can use .page-header .container – Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 9 '13 at 22:39
    
I don't understand why I have to wait so long to accept a great answer, though. – jp2code Dec 9 '13 at 22:43

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