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I'm new to AngularJS.

Can someone explain me why the active class not toggle between tabs in this code: http://jsfiddle.net/eSe2y/1/?

angular.module('myApp', [])
.filter('split', function () {
    return function (input, string) {
        var temp = string.split('|');
        for (var i in temp)
            input.push(temp[i]);
        return input;
    };
})
.directive('myTabs', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        scope: { tabs: '@' },
        template:
            "<div>" +
                "<a ng-repeat='e in [] | split:tabs' ng-click='selectedIndex = $index' ng-class='{active:$index==selectedIndex}'>{{e}}</a>" +
            "</div>",
        replace: true
    }
});

If I move the ng-click expression to a method of the controller, the code works as expected: http://jsfiddle.net/g36DY/1/.

angular.module('myApp', [])
.filter('split', function () {
    return function (input, string) {
        var temp = string.split('|');
        for (var i in temp)
            input.push(temp[i]);
        return input;
    };
})
.directive('myTabs', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        scope: { tabs: '@' },
        template:
            "<div>" +
                "<a ng-repeat='e in [] | split:tabs' ng-click='onSelect($index)' ng-class='{active:$index==selectedIndex}'>{{e}}</a>" +
            "</div>",
        replace: true,
        controller: ['$scope', function ($scope) {
            $scope.onSelect = function (index) {
                $scope.selectedIndex = index;
            }
        }]
    }
});

Can someone explain me the difference? And how to modify the first code to make it works without create a method to the controller?

Thanks in advance.

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This is a really common problem in angular. We just ran into it (again) today at work. Hope my explanation below helps. –  Ryan Gross Dec 10 '13 at 2:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Explanation of the Problem

The problem has to do with javascript inheritance as it relates to scopes and directives in angular. Basically, when in a child scope, all properties of basic types (int, boolean, etc) are copied from the parent.

In your case, the ng-repeat directive creates a child scope for each element, so each one of the links has its own scope. in the first example, selectedIndex is only referenced from within the repeater, each repeater element references its own copy of the selectedIndex. You can investigate this using the

In the second example, you define a selectedIndex object in the controller, which is the parent scope for the repeater. Because the selectedIndex property is undefined initially when it is passed into the controllers, they look to the parent for a definition. When this definition has a value set in the onSelect method, all of the repeater elements "see" this value, and update accordingly.

How to Debug

In the future, you can investigate these types issue using the Angular Batarang.

  1. browse to http://jsfiddle.net/eSe2y/1/show
  2. left-click one of the tabs
  3. right-click the same link
  4. select "inspect element"
  5. open the debug console and type $scope.selectedIndex
  6. repeat the above steps for another tab, and note how the value differs
  7. now go to the elements tab of the debugger, and click on the div
  8. enter $scope.selectedIndex and note that it is undefined

On the second fiddle, try viewing just the $scope on each of the tabs (not $scope.selectedIndex). You will see that selectedIndex is not defined on the repeater elements, so they default to the value from their parent.

Best Practices

The typical angular best practice to avoid this problem is to always reference items that could be change on the scope "after the dot". This takes advantage of the fact that JavaScript objects are inherited by reference, so when the property changes in one place, it changes for all scopes in the parent-child hierarchy. I've posted an updated fiddler that fixes the problem by simply pushing the binding onto an object:

angular.module('myApp', [])
.filter('split', function () {
    return function (input, string) {
        var temp = string.split('|');
        for (var i in temp)
            input.push(temp[i]);
        return input;
    };
})
.directive('myTabs', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        scope: { tabs: '@' },
        template:
            "<div>" +
            "<a ng-repeat='e in [] | split:tabs' ng-click='s.selectedIndex = $index' ng-class='{active:$index==s.selectedIndex}'>{{e}}</a>" +
            "</div>",
        replace: true,
        controller: ['$scope', function ($scope) {
            $scope.s = {};

        }]
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/g36DY/2/

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