Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please help me fill out the blanks here -

  1. The server keeps its private key and the public key is shared to the users. So the client trusts the content thats coming from the server using the public key. How does the client encrypt the contents he is sending back to the server ?. Using the public key of the server ? or does the client send a autogenerated private key and encrypts it using the public key which is then decypted by the server along with the message and used for furthter communication by both parties.

  2. A Public and a Private key is required to do ssl communication. This Key pair is generated using a self signed certificate ?. How can a single self signed certificate contain both public and private keys.

One more thing On message level security -- im looking at a current configuration and am pulling my hair out -- Using IBM Ikeyman to look at the producer and Consumer JKS files-- for Message level security(Digital Signing) there is a Personal certificate at the Consumer and a Signer certificate at the Producer ... Isnt this the other way around? Is this current configuration incorrect --- Both the keys are same by the way.

share|improve this question
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about security in general (not about programming) and so it's more suitable to security.stackexchange.com –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Dec 10 '13 at 13:32
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. The server keeps its private key and the public key is shared to the users.

Correct.

So the client trusts the content thats coming from the server using the public key.

No. There is no 'so' about it. The client trusts the server certificate because it is signed by someone he trusts, and he knows it belongs to the server because the server provides a digital signature that the client can verify, which only the private key owner can do. Therefore he knows that the server owns that public key.

How does the client encrypt the contents he is sending back to the server ?.

The client and server negotiate a shared session key independently using techniques described in RFC 2246. For the most part they don't involve PKI at all.

Using the public key of the server? or does the client send a autogenerated private key and encrypts it using the public key which is then decypted by the server along with the message and used for furthter communication by both parties.

Neither, see above. This is quite a large subject.

  1. A Public and a Private key is required to do ssl communication.

No. One of the parties must have a private key and a corresponding certificate that the other party trusts, otherwise the communication is insecure.

This Key pair is generated using a self signed certificate

No. The statement doesn't even make sense. Key pairs are generated first, nothing to do with certificates yet. The certificate is a wrapper for the public key.

How can a single self signed certificate contain both public and private keys.

It can't, and it doesn't. Self-signing doesn't have anything to do with it either.

share|improve this answer
    
Vow that makes a lot of things clear @EJP .... thanks –  AB Davinci Dec 10 '13 at 13:46
    
One more thing @EJP, im looking at a current configuration and am pulling my hair out -- –  AB Davinci Dec 10 '13 at 15:07
    
One more thing @EJP, im looking at a current configuration and am pulling my hair out -- Using IBM Ikeyman to look at the producer and Consumer JKS files-- for Message level security(Digital Signing) there is a Personal certificate at the Consumer and a Signer certificate at the Producer ... Isnt this the other way around? Is this current configuration incorrect --- Both the keys are same by the way. –  AB Davinci Dec 10 '13 at 15:17
    
The fact that the keys are the same is itself incorrect. A key pair, and therefore the corresponding certificate, is supposed to be the property of, and uniquely dentify, a single entity. –  EJP Dec 10 '13 at 21:14
    
I was talking about Symmetric Key (Single Key) Message Signing which can be used without HTTPS(Which involves the Public,Private and the Sessin Keys) . –  AB Davinci Dec 11 '13 at 12:06
add comment

Public-key encryption 101:

The public and private keys form a pair: each key in the pair can decrypt messages encrypted with the other, but cannot decrypt messages encrypted with itself. If the client can decrypt a message with the public key, it knows the message was encrypted by the owner of the public key. Conversely, a message encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted by the owner of the private key.

The basic idea is that the client generates a key for a symmetric-key cypher, encrypts it with the public key, and sends that to the server. Both sides then use that symmetric key and cypher for the majority of the communication.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second paragraph is not what happens in SSL. -1 –  EJP Dec 10 '13 at 12:08
add comment

In SSL communication,when the client wants to interact with some server, the server sends its public key. Always remember a certificate is nothing but a public key with a bunch of supporting information. The problem here is any hacker can masquerade as a server and can block the communication between server and client. So the server certificate must be signed by some certificate authority. The client only believes the server certificate if it is signed by a certificate authority.In that case the hacker in between can not masquerade as a server because its certificate will not be authenticated by the certificate authority.

So client accepts the certificate and gets the public key of server. Now the client can send its public key encrypted by the public key of the server. Since this encrypted message can only be decrypted by the private key of the server so only server can decrypt it.

But the use of public key and private key over the ssl communication can slow down the connection very much because these keys lengths are 1024 or 2048 bits.

So practically what happens is instead of sending its own public key, the client sends the symmetric key encrypted by the public key of the server. Server decrypts it with its private key and it gets to know the symmetric key. Now the further communication happens with this symmetric key encryption and decryption.Since no third party gets to know the symmetric key, the communication will be secure. Remember symmetric key lengths are generally 64-128 unlike public keys hence less the time for encryption and decryption.

share|improve this answer
    
The client doesn't 'send his public key encrypted by the public key of the server'. Public keys don't need to be encrypted at all, otherwise the same would apply to the server's public key. The client doesn't 'send the symmetric key encrypted by the outbound key of the server' either. The session key is computed independent by both ends, and never transmitted at all. -1 for all this misinformation. You need to take a good look at RFC 2246. –  EJP Dec 10 '13 at 12:16
    
yup...well I meant "any message".... by mistake it is done. By the way ur explanation is very clear . –  Sarwan Dec 10 '13 at 17:10
    
You meant 'any message' where? How? What does 'by mistake it is done' mean? –  EJP Dec 10 '13 at 22:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.