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So i've got two files with the following content:

File 1:
    Tom 965432145  
    Bill 932121234

File 2:
      Steve 923432323  
      Tom 933232323

and i want to merge them and write the resulting output to a file named 'out.txt'. i wrote this function to deal with duplicates (when the same name appears more than once, it choses what number goes into the final file).

the function is called choosing:

choosing :: [String] −> Int −> Int −> Int
choosing ("Name_of_person":_) num1 _ = num1 
choosing _ num1 num2
        | num2 ‘div‘ 100000000 == 2 = num2
        | otherwise = num1

Here's my attempt at this:

import System.IO
import Data.Char

choosing :: [String] −> Int −> Int −> Int
choosing name num1 _ = num1
choosing _ num1 num2
  | num2 `div` 100000000 == 2 = num2
  | otherwise = num1

main :: IO ()
main = do 
   in1 <- openFile "in1.txt" ReadMode
   in2 <- openFile "in2.txt" ReadMode
   out <- openFile "out.txt" WriteMode
   processData in1 in2 out
   hClose in1
   hClose in2
   hClose out



processData :: Handle -> Handle -> Handle -> IO ()
processData in1 in2 out =
    do ineof <- hIsEOF in1
       ineof2 <- h2IsEOF in2
        if ineof && ineof2
            then return ()
            else do inpStr <- hGetLine in1
                    inp2Str <- h2GetLine in2
                    num1Int <- num1GetNumber in1
                    num2Int <- num2GetNumber in2
                    if inpStr = inp2Str 
                        then PutStrLn out (impStr choosing inpStr num1Int num2Int )
                        else PutStrLn out (inpStr num1Int)
                             PutStrLn out (inp2Str num2Int)
                             processData in1 in2 out

However this kinda of makes sense to me, it doesn't compile and after a while trying to debug this i'm now starting to think there's some serious mistakes here, so i would really appreciate your help on this.

Here's my attempt at something simpler first:

import System.IO
import Data.Char


choosing name num1 _ = num1
choosing _ num1 num2
  | num2 `div` 100000000 == 2 = num2
  | otherwise = num1

main :: IO ()
main = do 
   in1 <- openFile "in1.rtf" ReadMode
   in2 <- openFile "in2.rtf" ReadMode
   out <- openFile "out.rtf" WriteMode
   mainloop in1 out
   mainloop in2 out
   hClose in1
   hClose in2
   hClose out


mainloop :: Handle -> Handle -> IO ()
mainloop _ out =
  do ineof <- hIsEOF in
     if ineof
       then return ()
       else do inpStr <- hGetLine in
               hPutStrLn out (inpStr)
               mainloop in out

but it's not working either...

UPDATED:

So basically i've been trying to solve my problem, with all the tips i got, i managed to do this:

import System.IO
import Data.Char

- Main function to run the program

main = do
  entries1 <- fmap parseEntries $ readFile "in1.txt"
  entries2 <- fmap parseEntries $ readFile "in2.txt"
  writeFile "out.txt" $ serializeEntries $ mergeEntries entries1 entries2

- Function to deal with duplicates

choosing name num1 _ = num1
choosing _ num1 num2
  | num2 `div` 100000000 == 2 = num2
  | otherwise = num1

- Function to read a line from a file into a tuple
Now i need help making this function 'cover' the whole file, and not just one line of it.

parseLine :: String -> (String, Int)
parseLine xs = (\(n:i:_) -> (n, read i)) (words xs)


- A function that receives entries, merges them into a single string so that it can be writen to a file.

import Data.Char

tupleToString :: (Int, Char) -> [Char]
tupleToString x = (intToDigit.fst) x:(snd x):[]

tuplesToStrings [] = []
tuplesToStrings (x:xs) = tupleToString x : tuplesToStrings xs

tuplesToString xs = (concat . tuplesToStrings) xs
share|improve this question
2  
Your code has a number of errors. I suggest you try to write something much simpler first, and come back to us with specific questions if you have them. –  Tom Ellis Dec 10 '13 at 11:15
    
@TomEllis the problems are in the processData function only, or in the main function as well ? –  dcarou Dec 10 '13 at 11:16
    
Only in processData I think. The rest looks fine. –  Tom Ellis Dec 10 '13 at 11:18
    
It would be also helpful if you would post what error GHC gives you. –  Kritzefitz Dec 10 '13 at 11:34
    
in process data,on the first 'do', how can i ask for the two files (because for only one is easy) if they are empty ? or the first character is and end of line character (that's what i'm trying to do there) @TomEllis –  dcarou Dec 10 '13 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that your thinking too imperative. In Haskell you usually split your solution in small blocks, and each block does only one thing. It's much easier to reason about one small block, and it's also easier to reuse that block in other parts. For example, here's how I would breakdown the code for this problem:

parseEntries :: String -> [(String, Int)]

A function that receives the content of a file and parses the entries. It the case of the content of in1.txt it would return [("Tom", 965432145), ("Bill", 932121234)]


mergeEntries :: [(String, Int)] -> [(String, Int)] -> [(String, Int)]

A function that receives entries from two files and merges them.


serializeEntries :: [(String, Int)] -> String

A function that receives entries, merges them into a single string so that it can be writen to a file.


Having defined these functions, main becomes as simple as this:

main = do
  entries1 <- fmap parseEntries $ readFile "in1.txt"
  entries2 <- fmap parseEntries $ readFile "in2.txt"
  writeFile "out.txt" $ serializeEntries $ mergeEntries entries1 entries2
share|improve this answer
    
That solution sounds great, and it is super easy to understand, but how would i do that exactly ? Because that's where i got stuck.. –  dcarou Dec 10 '13 at 18:39
    
and this way, how can i 'insert' the function choosing to deal with duplicates ? Because i guess what this does, is reading something from two files in tuples, merge the tuples, and then print it in a new file, is this correct ? Because, basically, i want to check each tuple to see if any of those have the same 'name' in the first entry of the tuple, and if that's the case, call the function choosing to decide which number goes into the final list. this way i only get a big list of names and numbers with duplicates –  dcarou Dec 10 '13 at 18:46
    
i guess the duplicate check should be in the function mergeEntries, so it merges them correctly in the first place, so there's no need to go over the list over and over again –  dcarou Dec 10 '13 at 18:55
1  
@dcarou An easy way to implement mergeEntries is to use fromListWith of module Data.Map. fromListWith takes care of merging duplicates for you; you just have to tell him how the merge is done (by passing a binary function). Afterwards you can get a list back by using fromList. –  Pedro Rodrigues Dec 10 '13 at 20:17
1  
Excellent answer, Pedro, but I'd add this: not only one should write those smaller functions separately, but also test them independently. In this, I'd start by trying to write mergeEntries. To test that it does the correct thing I'd write some example data cases as top-level constants right in the program file (as [(String, Integer)]; no need to worry about the parsing yet!), load it into ghci, and then just run the function on the examples to see if it produces correct results. Then only after that I'd move on to the other two pieces. –  Luis Casillas Dec 11 '13 at 0:54

Answering to your updated code:

  1. Now that you have a function to parse a line, parseEntries is easy. Use the lines function to split the content by lines, then map parseLine to each line.

  2. tuplesToStrings could be writen much simpler as tuplesToStrings = map tupleToString

  3. I don't see how tuplesToString will help you. Its type doesn't match the type returned by parseLine (parseLine returns a list of (String, Int) while tuplesToString expects a list of (Int, Char)). And it doesn't even insert spaces between words or between lines. Here's a possible implementation for serializeEntries (using Text.Printf module):

    serializeEntries entries = concatMap (uncurry $ printf "%s %d\n") entries

share|improve this answer
    
can you show me how to do parseEntries ? –  dcarou Dec 11 '13 at 20:42
    
tuplesToString was my attempt at writing a function that receives the list of tuples (after mergeEntries) and writes that list into a string. –  dcarou Dec 11 '13 at 20:43

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