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I have a function and I want it to execute. Does anyone know how to do this?

def a():

    a = 'print'
    print a
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be more specific –  Antony Hatchkins Jan 12 '10 at 14:30
4  
What Python tutorial are you following? I'd like to know which book left you with this question. –  S.Lott Jan 12 '10 at 15:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To do this you just use.

a()

If you want this for use inside the current file use:

if __name__ == '__main__': a()

And if you want to pass the variable a on for use in other functions use:

if __name__ == '__main__': b = a()

The 'b' being the variable and 'a' being the function you have defined.

So the whole function could look like this:

def a():

    b = 'print'
    print b

if __name__ == '__main__': b = a()
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The if __name__ == '__main__': is very confusing. Why do you write that so many times? –  S.Lott Jan 12 '10 at 16:04
    
@ S.Lott - I have taken note of your advice and don't have it written everywhere now. It is entered once at the bottom of the file. –  chrissygormley Jan 12 '10 at 17:02
    
After that the function a is shadowed by the variable a. Not good. –  lutz Jan 13 '10 at 8:43
    
@lutz, I was keeping the variable names and function names the same as the question asked. Edited now –  chrissygormley Jan 13 '10 at 9:07

The name of your function is a. It takes no arguments. So call it using a():

>>> def a():
...     a = 'print'
...     print a
... 
>>> a()
print

Note that you shadow the definition of a as a function within a itself, by defining a local variable with that same name. You may want to avoid that, as it may confuse you or other readers of your code. Also, it makes it impossible to apply recursion.

Anyway, in general, if f is some function object then you can call it by putting parentheses behind it, possibly containing some arguments. Example:

>>> def twice(text):
...     print text
...     print text
... 
>>> twice('the text I want to print twice')
the text I want to print twice
the text I want to print twice
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just write a() !

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I'm not sure I understood your question, but a simple function call goes as in

a()

of course, after the definition, so it would be

def a():

    a = 'print'
    print a

a()
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