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If you want to associate some constant value with a class, here are two ways to accomplish the same goal:

class Foo
{
public:
    static const size_t Life = 42;
};

class Bar
{
public:
    enum {Life = 42};
};

Syntactically and semantically they appear to be identical from the client's point of view:

size_t fooLife = Foo::Life;
size_t barLife = Bar::Life;

Is there any reason other than just pure style concerns why one would be preferable to another?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 36 down vote accepted

The enum hack used to be necessary because many compilers didn't support in-place initialization of the value. Since this is no longer an issue, go for the other option. Modern compilers are also capable of optimizing this constant so that no storage space is required for it.

The only reason for not using the static const variant is if you want to forbid taking the address of the value: you can't take an address of an enum value while you can take the address of a constant (and this would prompt the compiler to reserve space for the value after all, but only if its address is really taken).

Additionally, the taking of the address will yield a link-time error unless the constant is explicitly defined as well. Notice that it can still be initialized at the site of declaration:

struct foo {
    static int const bar = 42; // Declaration, initialization.
};

int const foo::bar; // Definition.
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1  
Actually - your compiler shouldn't allocate any storage space for the constant. The standard explicitly states that only if the object is "used", ie. it's address needed, is the definition for the object required. And then the developer has to provide a definition explicitly! –  Richard Corden Oct 16 '08 at 14:30
    
If you take the address of a "static const" but don't define it, then it should result in a linker error. –  Richard Corden Oct 16 '08 at 14:32
1  
Richard, you're mixing intialization with definition here; you can well initialize the constant inline and define it separately. But you're right, I need to clarify my posting. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 17 '08 at 7:19
    
Using your example with VS2010, the linker complains that foo::bar has a duplicate definition (even if I add code that explicitly takes the address of foo:bar). Is that a compiler bug? Does it make a difference that foo is part of a static library? –  Adrian McCarthy Dec 7 '11 at 13:53
    
@Adrian Simple, you are probably defining the constant in the header and use it in several compilation units. You cannot do that, for the usual reasons of the One Definition Rule. You need to define the constant in the implementation file instead of the header. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 7 '11 at 14:00

They're not identical:

size_t *pLife1 = &Foo::Life;
size_t *pLife2 = &Bar::Life;
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1  
Essentially what I said, in less words. ;-) –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 15 '08 at 14:46
    
You're fast, partner. But I'll always be the fastest gun in these here parts... –  Mike F Oct 15 '08 at 14:48
1  
See, that's why I like Stack Overflow... –  John Dibling Oct 15 '08 at 14:51
1  
Code sample should read (with added consts): const size_t *pLife1 = &Foo::Life; const size_t *pLife2 = &Bar::Life; The first is ok, but the second yields a compiler error, since the identifiers in an enumerator list are declared as constants, and you cannot take the address of a constant. –  boycy Aug 13 '12 at 8:36

One difference is that the enum defines a type that can be used as a method parameter, for example, to get better type checking. Both are treated as compile time constants by the compiler, so they should generate identical code.

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Well, if needed, you can take the address of a static const Member Value. You've have to declare a separate member variable of enum type to take the address of it.

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Another third solution?

One subtle difference is that the enum must be defined in the header, and visible for all. When you are avoiding dependencies, this is a pain. For example, in a PImpl, adding an enum is somewhat counter-productive:

// MyPImpl.hpp

class MyImpl ;

class MyPimpl
{
   public :
      enum { Life = 42 } ;
   private :
      MyImpl * myImpl ;
}

Another third solution would be a variation on the "const static" alternative proposed in the question: Declaring the variable in the header, but defining it in the source:

// MyPImpl.hpp

class MyImpl ;

class MyPimpl
{
   public :
      static const int Life ;
   private :
      MyImpl * myImpl ;
}

.

// MyPImpl.cpp
const int MyPImpl::Life = 42 ;

Note that the value of MyPImpl::Life is hidden from the user of MyPImpl (who includes MyPImpl.hpp).

This will enable the MyPimpl author to change the value of "Life" as needed, without needing the MyPImpl user to recompile, as is the overall aim of the PImpl.

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The enum hack is worth knowing about for several reasons. First, the enum hack behaves in some ways more like a #define than a const does, and sometimes that's what you want. For example, it's legal to take the address of a const, but it's not legal to take the address of an enum, and it's typically not legal to take the address of a #define, either. If you don't want to let people get a pointer or reference to one of your integral constants, an enum is a good way to enforce that constraint. (For more on enforcing design constraints through coding decisions, consult Item 18.) Also, though good compilers won't set aside storage for const objects of integral types (unless you create a pointer or reference to the object), sloppy compilers may, and you may not be willing to set aside memory for such objects. Like #defines, enums never result in that kind of unnecessary memory allocation.

Effictive c++ Book

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static const values are treated as r-values just like enum in 99% of code you'll see. Constant r-values never have memory generated for them. The advantage enum constants is they can't become l-values in that other 1%. The static const values are type safe and allow for floats, c-strings, etc.

The compiler will make Foo::Life an l-value if it has memory associated with it. The usual way to do that is to take its address. e.g. &Foo::Life;

Here is a subtle example where GCC will use the address:

int foo = rand()? Foo::Life: Foo::Everthing;

The compiler generated code uses the addresses of Life and Everything. Worse, this only produces a linker error about the missing addresses for Foo::Life and Foo::Everything. This behavior is completely standard conforming, though obviously undesirable. There are other compiler specific ways that this can happen, and all standard conforming.

Once you have a conforming c++11 compiler the correct code will be

class Foo {
 public:
  constexpr size_t Life = 42;
};

This is guaranteed to always be an l-value and it's type-safe, the best of both worlds.

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