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(I have edited this question, so that it's now different from the original question.)

I have different, but same schema, databases. I have modeled this schema with a .edmx Entity Framework model in my application

So to sum up, the same database schema living on multiple SQL Servers, and being able, at run time, to change the database connection of my .edmx model, so I can switch between accessing these various databases.

Now I would like to switch between these different databases at runtime. Preferably in a simple way. How, precisely, do I do that?

Step by step tutorial or precise, all comprising, code example would be appreciated.

Below is an example of how my connection strings looks in the Web.config:

<add name="MyModelEntities" connectionString="metadata=res://*/Dal.ToolA.ToolATestOne.csdl|res://*/Dal.ToolA.ToolATestOne.ssdl|res://*/Dal.ToolA.ToolATestOne.msl;provider=System.Data.SqlClient;provider connection string=&quot;data source=MyServer\MySqlServer;initial catalog=MyDatabase;user id=MyUser;password=MyPassword;MultipleActiveResultSets=True;App=EntityFramework&quot;" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" />
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4 Answers 4

All you would need to do is to switch the default connection string depending on what country they wanted to access. Just store the matching connection string as a static variable after the user picks a country, and then override your DbContext's constructor to always use that variable.

Like so:

For the connection string:

public static class StaticVariables
{
  public static string ConnectionString { get; set; }
}

For your DbContext constructor:

public DbContext()
{
  this(StaticVariables.ConnectionString);
}
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I have added some Edit text in the bottom of my question. My country databases are not always the same. EF has modeled my SPROCs and entities for the different country databases. I find it a little hard to understand if it would be enough to change the connection string to switch between these different EF models. –  RuneHansen Dec 11 '13 at 8:42
    
Thank you for your reply IronMan, I have pasted an example of my connection string in the bottom of my question above. I am a little unsure about what parts exactly the connection string is? Exactly what part of the code above is my connection string? –  RuneHansen Dec 13 '13 at 9:34
    
A link to a code example would also be welcome :) –  RuneHansen Dec 13 '13 at 9:45

You can use something as shown below to change the connection string http://tutorials.csharp-online.net/Connect_Data_ADO_NET%E2%80%94Change_Database_Open_Connection

When you want to switch DB, use a method as

    EntityInstance_ReviewEntities.GetContext(GetConnectionString(country));

In the country value you can pass the current country and get the connection string and assign it to context as well.

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I have added some Edit text in the bottom of my question. My country databases are not always the same. EF has modeled my SPROCs and entities for the different country databases. I find it a little hard to understand if it would be enough to change the connection string to switch between these different EF models. –  RuneHansen Dec 11 '13 at 8:47
    
Yes change the connection string and then get the new context as well. The method I gave you above is enough to get the new context. –  Satii Dec 11 '13 at 11:17
    
I don't seem to have access to any GetContext() method in my code. Is there any good tutorial around with a code example? –  RuneHansen Dec 11 '13 at 12:52

The DbContext class has a constructor parameter nameOrConnectionString. Depending on how you initialize your DbContext, you can pass a different connection string name. If you for example store them on country name, like:

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="YourApplication_UK" connectionString="..."/>
  <add name="YourApplication_Norway" connectionString="..."/>
  <add name="YourApplication_Sweden" connectionString="..."/>
</connectionStrings>

Then from code, you can construct the appropriate connection string name:

string connectionStringName = "YourApplication_" + myApplicationLocation;
var dbContext = new DbContext(connectionStringName);
share|improve this answer
    
I have added some Edit text in the bottom of my question. My country databases are not always the same. EF has modeled my SPROCs and entities for the different country databases. I find it a little hard to understand if it would be enough to change the connection string to switch between these different EF models. –  RuneHansen Dec 11 '13 at 8:43
    
Thank you CodeCaster, but... When I write var dbContext = new DbContext(connectionStringName); I can't access my SPROCs dbContext.sprocMySproc() When I write var entityFramework = new MyDatabaseNameEntities(); My entities doesn't have a method with a parameter. Is there a code example around for what you suggest? –  RuneHansen Dec 13 '13 at 12:06
    
The var dbContext = ... should of course initialize your specific context, so var dbContext = MyDatabaseNameEntities(connectionStringName). You might have to create a new constructor in MyDatabaseNameEntities accepting a string, and calling : base(connectionStringName). –  CodeCaster Dec 13 '13 at 14:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for your response. Sorry for my unclarity about the question.

I have now figured out how to do it. I found these two great links.

http://mosesofegypt.net/post/Multiple-database-support-with-Entity-Framework.aspx

http://bestplayah.com/entity-framework-dynamic-schema-changes-using-database-first-approach/

So I am making a constructor which takes a connection string, as a partial class with the same name.

public partial class MyDatabaseEntities : DbContext
{
    public MyDatabaseEntities(string connectionString)
        : base(connectionString)
    {
    }
}

And then I am dynamically generating a connection string to different databases. Thus I am able to switch database runtime :)

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