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I want to run a certain script based on a set of IP's that have been given to me.

The script I have below works just fine, however it seems sloppy and like too much code for what I want to accomplish.

I have simplified the number of IP addresses so as not to clutter up the screen.

<script>
    //Initialize the array
    //HostMin: 196.145.179.129  HostMax:   196.145.179.130            
    var $ipArray = ["196.145.179.129","196.145.179.130"];
    //HostMin: 50.207.77.201  HostMax:   50.207.77.204            
    $ipArray.push("50.207.77.201","50.207.77.202","50.207.77.203","50.207.77.204");
    //HostMin: 57.179.277.209  HostMax:   57.179.277.214       
    $ipArray.push("57.179.277.209","57.179.277.210","57.179.277.211","57.179.277.212","57.179.277.213","57.175.277.214");
    //HostMin: 74.97.164.65  HostMax:   74.97.164.66       
    $ipArray.push("74.97.164.65","74.97.164.66");

    $ipAddr = "74.97.164.65";

    if ($.inArray($ipAddr, $ipArray ) >= 0) {
        //Do Something
    }else{
        //Do Something else
    }
</script>    

I do have info such as an IP Filter - 50.207.77.201/30 if this makes a difference.

Any help in rewriting this would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
This is definitely a problem worth fixing because I don't think x.x.277.x is a valid IP. –  Corey Ogburn Dec 10 '13 at 15:27
    
I have changed some numbers as to omit the actual IP's I'm using. –  bigmike7801 Dec 10 '13 at 15:30
4  
your use of $ is confusing. By convention javascript developers tend to prefix variables with $ only when the variable refers to a jQuery object. –  Jamiec Dec 10 '13 at 15:35
    
Your code does not look sloppy at all - I can tell what it does by looking at it - it's dead simple - there are no function calls and it's all right there. Sure - it's simple, but that's a good thing. If this is your only use case I'd definitely keep it the same way. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 10 '13 at 15:42
2  
Keep in mind that client-side script can be easily modified. Also, it probably is not a good idea to list IP addresses client side in general. –  Ṣhmiddty Dec 10 '13 at 15:43

3 Answers 3

I am not a smart man and posted a PHP response. Since others in this thread have mentioned my answer I will not delete it. You could theoretically use this function and the basic logic of my answer in Javascript though:

function ip2long (IP) {
  // http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net
  // +   original by: Waldo Malqui Silva
  // +   improved by: Victor
  // +    revised by: fearphage (http://http/my.opera.com/fearphage/)
  // +    revised by: Theriault
  // *     example 1: ip2long('192.0.34.166');
  // *     returns 1: 3221234342
  // *     example 2: ip2long('0.0xABCDEF');
  // *     returns 2: 11259375
  // *     example 3: ip2long('255.255.255.256');
  // *     returns 3: false
  var i = 0;
  // PHP allows decimal, octal, and hexadecimal IP components.
  // PHP allows between 1 (e.g. 127) to 4 (e.g 127.0.0.1) components.
  IP = IP.match(/^([1-9]\d*|0[0-7]*|0x[\da-f]+)(?:\.([1-9]\d*|0[0-7]*|0x[\da-f]+))?(?:\.([1-9]\d*|0[0-7]*|0x[\da-f]+))?(?:\.([1-9]\d*|0[0-7]*|0x[\da-f]+))?$/i); // Verify IP format.
  if (!IP) {
    return false; // Invalid format.
  }
  // Reuse IP variable for component counter.
  IP[0] = 0;
  for (i = 1; i < 5; i += 1) {
    IP[0] += !! ((IP[i] || '').length);
    IP[i] = parseInt(IP[i]) || 0;
  }
  // Continue to use IP for overflow values.
  // PHP does not allow any component to overflow.
  IP.push(256, 256, 256, 256);
  // Recalculate overflow of last component supplied to make up for missing components.
  IP[4 + IP[0]] *= Math.pow(256, 4 - IP[0]);
  if (IP[1] >= IP[5] || IP[2] >= IP[6] || IP[3] >= IP[7] || IP[4] >= IP[8]) {
    return false;
  }
  return IP[1] * (IP[0] === 1 || 16777216) + IP[2] * (IP[0] <= 2 || 65536) + IP[3] * (IP[0] <= 3 || 256) + IP[4] * 1;
}

Hopefully someone smarter than me (low bar) will post a better answer for you.


I have found the ip2long function is perfectly suited for this use case

$low     = ip2long($low_address);
$high    = ip2long($high_address);
$user_ip = ip2long($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);

if($user_ip >= $low && $user_ip <= $high){
    // do something
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Er, that's php, the question is about javascript –  bfavaretto Dec 10 '13 at 15:29
    
This question is tagged javascript. Although I must admit his use of $ in his variable names made me look twice. –  Corey Ogburn Dec 10 '13 at 15:30
    
I like to use the $ for readability in javascript. –  bigmike7801 Dec 10 '13 at 15:31
    
@bfavaretto Doh! Sorry about that, I will revise my answer. I use $ in JS as well but failed to look at the question tag. –  Rob M. Dec 10 '13 at 15:33
2  
I love you..... –  Jhoopins Dec 10 '13 at 15:34

This answer does not completely answer the OP question but rather augments Rob M's existing answer. It provides a simpler, faster function that does most of the work.

JavaScript function to convert an IP address to a 32-bit unsigned integer

// Convert an IPv4 dotted quad address to unsigned 32-bit integer
// Return FALSE if IP address is not well formed
function ip2int(ip) {
    var val = false,        // Assume passed IP is invalid.
        // Regex to validate and parse an IP (version 4) address.
        re_valid_ipv4       = /^(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$/;
    // Use String.replace() with callback to validate and parse in one whack.
    ip.replace(re_valid_ipv4,   
        function(m0,m1,m2,m3,m4){
            val = ((m1 << 24) + (m2 << 16) + (m3 << 8) + (+m4)) >>> 0;
            return '';
        });
    return val;
}
share|improve this answer

I found an iplib.js that might just be perfect for you.

In their usage wiki, they talk about iterating over a network (by using a subnet mask, not by actually interacting with the network) and I think it'll meet your needs perfectly.

   var ip = new IPv4("192.168.0.100");
   var subnet = new Subnet("/24");

   var ipnet = new IPv4Network(ip,subnet);

   var network = ipnet.network();     //IPv4("192.168.0.0")
   var broadcast = ipnet.broadcast(); //IPv4("192.168.255.255");

   var stopIP = new IPv4("192.168.0.10");
   range_ips = [];                
   ipnet.iter(function(ip,index) {
       range_ips.push(ip);
       if(ip.equals(stopIP)) return false;
   });

   //check IPs are in a network
   var is_contained = ipnet.contains(ip)           //true;
   var total = ipnet.count();                      //254
share|improve this answer
    
This is longer code than what OP has - and it's also less clear. Not to mention the overhead from the library. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 10 '13 at 15:38

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