Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading the first section of "Scala in depth", there are two sentences in the first section about "covariance" and "contrvariance":

Covariance (+T or ? extends T) is when a type can be coerced down the inheritance hierarchy.

Contravariance(-T or ? super T) is when a type can be coerced up the inheritance hierarchy.

I have read some documents about "Covariance" and "Contravariance", but I can't understand the word "coerced down" and "coerced up" here in this context.

share|improve this question
    
The first is called 'covariance' (not 'convariance'), so I have edited this –  0__ Dec 10 '13 at 15:47
    
@0__ Thank you, that's a hard word :) –  Freewind Dec 10 '13 at 15:48
    
possible duplicate of Scala covariance / contravariance question –  dhg Dec 10 '13 at 16:31
    
@dhg I think the question is perhaps not "what is covariance/contravariance?" but rather "what has coercion got to do with it (and which type is being coerced, etc)?" –  DNA Dec 10 '13 at 16:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
[TOP / ABSTRACT]

Thing
  ↓
Animal
  ↓
Human
  ↓
Programmer
  ↓
Scala Dev

[BOTTOM / SPECIFIC]

Covariance: Accept T or lower.
I asked for a [+Human], I will accept any of these: [Human, Programmer, Scala Dev].

Contravariance: Accept T or higher.
I asked for a [-Human], I will accept any of these: [Thing, Animal, Human].

Inariance: Accept T and only T.

Coercion.
Coercing a type up/down the type hierarchy means checking that a type's super/sub type passes type constraints. For example, a covariant function needs a Human but we've only got a Programmer, that's ok, the compiler can coerce the Programmer into Human to satisfy typing constraints.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer. The only question is in the case of "For example, a covariant function needs a Human but we've only got a Programmer, that's ok, the compiler can coerce the Programmer into Human to satisfy typing constraints.", we should call it "coerce up" or "coerce down"? –  Freewind Dec 11 '13 at 13:34
2  
Coercing a Programmer into a Human would be "coercing up". Hey I just realised that's the opposite of what the excerpt you pasted says! Hmmm, I'd say the author made a mistake. –  Golly Dec 11 '13 at 23:45

In this case coerced means the compiler can treat the type as a type further up/down the inheritance hierarchy.

Think of it as upcasting or downcasting except the compiler is doing it automatically, so it is not a cast (which could suggest that explicit code was required to perform it).

share|improve this answer

This response is taken from lectures given by Martin Odersky (the creator of Scala) on Coursera. We note:

S<:T means: S is a subtype of T, and
S >: T means: S is a supertype of T, or T is a subtype of S.

Say C[T] is a parameterized type and A, B are types such that A<:B. In general there is three possible relationships between C[A] and C[B]:

C[A] <:C[B] ---------> C is covariant
C[A] >:C[B] ---------> C is contravariant
neither C[A] nor C[B] is a subtype of the other ---------> C is nonvariant

Scala lets you declare the variance of a type by annotating the type parameter:

class C[+A] { ... }  ---------> C is covariant
class C[-A] { ... } ----------> C is contravariant
class C[A] { ... } -----------> C is nonvariant

Hope this might help!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.