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I am learning Haskell and I am having trouble understanding this function. I am implementing mergesort. I have the mergesort recursive function implemented, but I don't understand what this 'merge' function is doing. I understand merge sort in an imperative language, but I don't understand the syntax here.

merge []         ys                   = ys
merge xs         []                   = xs
merge xs@(x:xt) ys@(y:yt) | x <= y    = x : merge xt ys
                          | otherwise = y : merge xs yt
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From what I see this function merges two sorted lists, and returns a sorted list. What is it that you don't understand? Is it the syntax? –  Pedro Rodrigues Dec 10 '13 at 16:00
    
Yes, see my edit. Thanks. –  csnate Dec 10 '13 at 16:04
    
see haskell.org/haskellwiki/Keywords#.40. –  Will Ness Dec 10 '13 at 17:12
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
merge []         ys                   = ys

If the first argument is empty, give the second argument.

merge xs         []                   = xs

If the second argument is empty, give the first argument.

merge xs@(x:xt) ys@(y:yt) | x <= y    = x : merge xt ys
                          | otherwise = y : merge xs yt

If x is smaller than or equal to y, cons (add to the front) x to the result of merging the rest of xs (which is xt) with ys. Otherwise y was smaller, so cons it to the result of merging xs with the rest of ys (which is yt).

xs@(x:xt) is parameter destructuring using a "placeholder". The result is that xs will refer to the entire first argument, while x is the head and xt is the tail.

Since merge is recursively defined, it will continue to cons elements from xs and ys until at least one is empty and then simply return it.

The bars (|) signify "guards", which let you define conditions in a nice and succinct manner.

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What about the xs@(x:xt) and ys@(y:yt) signature? –  csnate Dec 10 '13 at 16:07
    
@csreap3r added explanation of placeholder –  Erik Kronberg Dec 10 '13 at 16:09
    
So are the use of the 'pipes' basically conditional statements? –  csnate Dec 10 '13 at 16:13
1  
Yes! They are called "guards" –  Erik Kronberg Dec 10 '13 at 16:14
    
@csreap3r I recommend reading learnyouahaskell.com which is a marvelous book –  Erik Kronberg Dec 10 '13 at 16:18
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The function pattern matches on both of it's arguments. Let's look at each of the individual clauses:

merge []         ys                   = ys

So, merging an empty list and another list ys results in ys.

merge xs         []                   = xs

This is like the first clause, just the other way around: merging a list xs and an empty list gives xs.

merge xs@(x:xt) ys@(y:yt) | x <= y    = x : merge xt ys
                          | otherwise = y : merge xs yt

This is the recursive clause. Here the function pattern matches on both of it's arguments, so that:

  • xs is the first list, and is deconstructed (via an as-pattern) into the head x and the tail xt
  • ys is the second list, which is deconstructed into it's head y and it's tail yt.

Now, if the head of the first list is smaller or equal than the head of the second list (first guard), then the result is just the head of the first list y followed by the result of merging the tail of the first list (this is xt) and the second list ys. We do the opposite if y smaller greater than x.

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Let's break this down line by line:

  1. merge [] ys = ys

    This line pattern matches on the first list. If the first list is an empty list (i.e. []), then return the second list.

  2. merge xs [] = xs

    Same as before, only with the lists role reversed.

  3. merge xs@(x:xt) ys@(y:yt)

    A pattern match like (x:xt) matches only if the list element is non-empty. If it matches x is set to the first element, and xt is set to the rest of a list. Remember that : is the list constructor operator (i.e., 1 : [2, 3] == [1, 2, 3]). The xs@... prefix means that whole list is set to xs. This is useful if you need refer to the whole list as well as to its head and tail, at the same time.

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