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Sorry if this seems like a freshman CS question but I'm trying to pickup some objective c and reviewing pointers and I'm trying to pass a pointer to an array of ints (see all caps comment for problem - caveat I could be REALLY confused about how all this works; I promise I knew it once).

I have:

int (*d)[];  //a pointer to an array of ints.
int e[3]={12,45,789};

d=&e; // works
a=g(d);
NSLog(@"here is %i", a);
...

//  THIS PART IS THE PROBLEM
// trying to declare for passing a pointer array of ints
int g(int []); // no
int g(int *[]); // no
int g(int (*)[]); // no

int g(myArray){ // ERROR conflicting types for g
    return 2313459;
}

How would I declare this function to accept a pointer to an array of ints (or is there something else I want to be doing)?

thx

share|improve this question
    
You write “no” for the various ways of declaring g but do not explain why you think any of them are unacceptable. The first is usually used to pass an array by passing the address of its first element rather than by passing the array itself. The second is wrong because it declares the parameter to be an array of pointers. The third is correct if you wish to pass a pointer to the array, which your previous code d=&e; and a=g(d); does. Why do you think the third way does not work? –  Eric Postpischil Dec 10 '13 at 16:59
    
Why are you trying to do it and how does this relate to Obj-C? –  Wain Dec 10 '13 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may pass an array either via a pointer to the array or via a pointer to the first element. Samples are:

#include <stdio.h>

int g(int (*A)[])   //  A is a pointer to an array.
{
    return (*A)[1];
}

int h(int A[])      //  A is a pointer to the first element.
{
    return A[1];
}

int main(void)
{
    int (*d)[];
    int e[3] = { 12, 45, 789 };
    d = &e;
    printf("%d\n", g(d));   //  Pass a pointer to the array.
    printf("%d\n", g(&e));  //  Pass a pointer to the array.
    printf("%d\n", h(*d));  //  Pass a pointer to first element.
    printf("%d\n", h(e));   //  Pass a pointer to first element.
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thx, let me think through all of this –  timpone Dec 10 '13 at 17:19
    
Don't you need to specify the size of the array for g? IOW, shouldn't it be int g(int (*A)[3])? Or is Obj-C looser about that than C? –  John Bode Dec 10 '13 at 18:41
    
@JohnBode: The size is not needed because it is not used. The expression (*A)[1] immediately dereferences A, producing a pointer to an array of unknown size, which is automatically converted to a pointer to int. It compiles without problem in Apple GCC 4.2.1 with -pedantic and -std=c99. Curiously, one might think A[0][1] is equivalent, but it is, by definition, (*(A+0))[1], and the pointer arithmetic in A+0 nominally requires the size (C 2011 [N1570] 6.5.6 1 “or one operand shall be a pointer to a complete object type…”), so GCC reports an error. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 10 '13 at 18:45

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