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I have two blocks of code which I believe should produce the same result:

1.

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    var j=i;
    setTimeout(function(){
        console.log(j);
    },100);
}

2.

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    (function(j){
        setTimeout(function(){
            console.log(j);
        },100);
    })(i);
}

However, as most of you might expect, the first one log 9 ten times, and the second one log correctly from 0 to 9.

The second one is using closure to preserve the value of i. I think the first one should preserve the value as well, because:

  1. the var j create a new variable j in each iteration.
  2. current i value is assigned to this new j in the iteration.
  3. this new j is then bound to the setTimeout's function in the same iteration.
  4. next iteration will bind a new j to the function in that iteration.

But it turns out that the j is bound to the last i value for all iteration.

So, whats the differences between creating a variable using function argument and var ?

Please point out any mistake ! Thanks in advance !


Thank you all ! I did not know that javascript only has function and global scope ! Blame the other languages who taught me to do so :P

share|improve this question
    
"the var j create a new variable j in each iteration" no it doesn't. –  zzzzBov Dec 10 '13 at 16:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second one is using closure to preserve the value of i.

In fact, both results you're seeing are as a result of how closures work. Both of the functions you're passing into setTimeout are closures.

I think the first one should preserve the value as well, because:

the var j create a new variable j in each iteration.

No, it doesn't. There's only one j in your first example. In JavaScript (for now), variables only have function or global scope, never block scope. What the JavaScript actually does with your first example looks much more like this:

var i;
var j;

for(i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    j=i;
    setTimeout(function(){
        console.log(j);
    },100);
}

The resulting closure has an enduring reference to that one j variable, which is why you get the same value over and over.

Your second example is a bit of an anti-pattern, because it's both hard to read, and it's needlessly creating and throwing away functions on every loop. Let's make that more obvious by adding some variables; this code does exactly the same thing as your second example, the only change is the intermediate variables I've added:

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    var f1 = function(j){
        var f2 = function(){
            console.log(j);
        };
        setTimeout(f2,100);
    };
    f1(i);
}

Instead:

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    setTimeout(makeHandler(i));
}

function makeHandler(j){
    return function(){
        console.log(j);
    };
}

Both easier to read and it avoids re-creating the makeHandler function on each loop.

More to explore (on my blog):

share|improve this answer
    
enduring reference, that's a nice term. Did you come up with it? –  Halcyon Dec 10 '13 at 16:48
    
@FritsvanCampen: Yes, it took me a while to come up with that phrase for it, but I was happy with it when I finally did. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 10 '13 at 16:59

So, whats the differences between creating a variable using function argument and var ?

There's nothing about the differences between argument and var with your code.

It's because the assumption of

the var j create a new variable j in each iteration.

is simply wrong. As other answers told, only functions create scope.

You can prove it using the following code which

  1. removes the parameter from the closure
  2. declares j in the closure

 

for (var i=0; i<10; i+=1) {
    (function () {
        var j=i;
        setTimeout(function () { console.log(j); }, 100);
    })();
}

That's it.

share|improve this answer

It's the setTimeout, it defers the execution until the browser is available, or in this case 0.1 seconds later, and as the loop blocks the browser, the timeOuts aren't executed until after the loop has completed, and by that time the variable i equals the last thing it was set to in the loop, as the loop has completed before the code in the setTimeout is executed.

By passing the variable to another function as arguments inside the loop, the variable is local to that functions scope, and keeps it's value indepedent of the iteration.

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    var j=i;                // j is constantly updated and it's also hoisted
    setTimeout(function(){  // and this runs last, when the browser is no longer
        console.log(j);     // locked, so j is the last value it was set to
    },100);
}

and

for(var i=0;i<10;i+=1){
    (function(j){ // creates a new scope with a local variable, the argument j
        setTimeout(function(){
            console.log(j);
        },100);
    })(i); // passing i to the functions scope
}
share|improve this answer
    
so var j does not create a new j in each iteration ? –  user3087656 Dec 10 '13 at 16:46
    
No, there is no special scope in the for loop, so j is local to whatever scope the loop is in, and variables are hoisted, so you need a closure to keep the value constant –  adeneo Dec 10 '13 at 16:48

the var j create a new variable j in each iteration.

What you think is unfortunately not what Javascript thinks. In Javascript, all variable declarations are moved to the top of the enclosing fucntion so when you type

function(){
    for(var i=1; i<10; i++){

Javascript actually understands it as

function(){
    var i;
    for(i=1; i<20; i++){

This variable hoisting is most confusing in for loops with closures, but it also happens in other kinds of blocks. For example, in languages with regular lexical scope, the following code would print "1" because the inner "x" is a separate variable that only exists inside that branch of the if statement:

var x = 1;
if(true){
   var x = 2;
}
console.log(x);

However, in Javascript the inner variable declaration gets hoisted out so its actually as if you had written

var x;
x = 1;
if(true){
   x = 2;
}
console.log(x);
share|improve this answer

In your first code sample j is not bound the value of i in that iteration of the loop. This is because you can't declare variables in a loop. Loops have no scope in JavaScript, only functions have scope.

The first code sample is equivalent to:

var i, j; // all variable declarations are hoisted to the top
for (i = 0; i < 10; i += 1) {
    j = i;
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log(j);
    }, 100);
}

Since in the second code sample j is declared in the anonymous-immediate function it is bound to the value of i in that iteration because of a pass-by-value trick. This is called closing the scope or simply a closure.

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