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So i'm going over recursion in class and i can't seem to get my mind around it. Any suggestions to help picture the process?

From the sample test im doing:

class Q4
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        f(3);
    }
    public static void f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0)
        {
            System.out.println(x);
            f(x-1);
            System.out.println(x);
            f(x-1);
        }
        System.out.println("bert");
    }
}

I see the output but i don't understand why it is the output. Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A good way to think about recursion is to start with the base case, and then see what happens when you apply the recursive step one step at a time.

Base case: f(0)

The base case here is when x <= 0. What is the output of f(0)? We can see this straight away because the if statement is never entered. The base case output is:

bert

Recursive step: f(1)

Now let's see what happens for f(1). When x is 1 the code enters the if statement and ends up calling f(0) twice. If you substitute 1 for x in the function body, you'll see that the following statements are executed:

System.out.println(1);
f(0);
System.out.println(1);
f(0);
System.out.println("bert");

It's obvious what the println statements do, but what about the two f(0) calls? Well, we know what f(0) prints because we already analyzed the base case. f(0) prints bert. So the output from the lines above is:

1       // System.out.println(1);
bert    // f(0);
1       // System.out.println(1);
bert    // f(0);
bert    // System.out.println("bert");

Recursive step: f(2)

If you apply the same analysis to f(2), you'll see that it executes:

System.out.println(2);
f(1);
System.out.println(2);
f(1);
System.out.println("bert");

And if we substitute in the output of f(1) at the two places where f(1) is called, we get:

2       // System.out.println(2);
1       // f(1);
bert
1
bert
bert
2       // System.out.println(2);
1       // f(1);
bert
1
bert
bert
bert    // System.out.println("bert");

Recursive step: f(3)

And finally, f(3) executes:

System.out.println(3);
f(2);
System.out.println(3);
f(2);
System.out.println("bert");

Substituting in f(2)'s output, we get:

3       // System.out.println(3);
2       // f(2);
1       
bert
1
bert
bert
2       
1       
bert
1
bert
bert
bert    
3       // System.out.println(3);
2       // f(2);
1       
bert
1
bert
bert
2       
1       
bert
1
bert
bert
bert    
bert    // System.out.println("bert");
share|improve this answer

By looking at f and x we can see what f would do in those cases.

f(3) means:

System.out.println(3);
f(2);
System.out.println(3);
f(2);
System.out.println("bert");

f(2) means:

System.out.println(2);
f(1);
System.out.println(2);
f(1);
System.out.println("bert");

f(1) means:

System.out.println(1);
f(0);
System.out.println(1);
f(0);
System.out.println("bert");

f(0) means:

System.out.println("bert");

So putting everything together means we're getting interleaved outputs of numbers being decremented and "bert". To see where each number or "bert" comes from you'll need to step through the recursive calls to see what's happening.

For example, you'll end with several "bert" strings in a row at the end but that's because each call to f ends with printing "bert".

share|improve this answer

Walk through the code on paper.

f(3):
    "3"
    f(3-1) = f(2):
        "2"
         f(2-1) = f(1):
              "1"
              f(1-1) = f(0):
                   "bert"
              "1"
              f(1-1) = f(0):
                   "bert"
         f(2-1) = f(1):
              "1"
               //...
share|improve this answer

Each time f(x-1) is being called, a new local scope for f is created and a new local variable called x is available only within that local scope:

Calling f(3) creates a new local scope wherein the local variable x is initialised to the value of 3. Let's call this new local scope LS1. Stepping through this method, we can see that 3 > 0 is true, so the method prints out 3 (first call to System.out(x).

Then the method calls itself, but passes a value of x-1. The first thing the JVM does here is calculate x-1, which is 2. Note that it does not assign the result to x; the variable x in the scope we have called LS1 is still 3.

What it does instead is call f(2). This creates a new local scope with a local variable called x. Lets call this new local scope LS2. In LS2, we cannot access any variables from the LS1. LS2 has its own set of local variables - new blocks in memory allocated for LS2 which are different to those for LS1. The local variable x in LS2 is now initialised with a value of 2.

Again, we can now step through f to follow the flow. The system prints out 2, then calculates x-1 (which equals 1) and it calls f(1). Again, in calling f(1) a new local scope is created (let's call it LS3), with another new block of memory allocated for its local variables.

The value of x in LS3 is initialised to 1 and the method continues. It prints out 1, then calls f(0). This creates a new local scope (let's call it LS4) with a new memory block allocated for its local variables. x in LS4 is initialised to 0. Stepping through f, we find 0 > 0 is false, so that block of code is ignored. bert is printed out and the method exits.

The local scope LS4 is now destroyed and its memory block (containing its local variables) is deallocated back to the heap. Control has now fallen back to the local scope we called LS3. Looking back, we can see that the last value of the variable x in LS3 was 1. The next instruction says to print this out, so 1 is printed, then print out bert then exit the method.

Exiting now destroys the local scope we called LS3. Control flow falls back into the local scope we called LS2. The variable x in LS2 was set to 2, so 2 is printed, followed by bert.

Method exits, destroying LS2 and falling back to LS1. x in LS1 is 3, so 3 is printed, followed by bert. Method exits, and the program finishes.

Hope that all makes sense!

EDIT

Sorry, I missed the second call to f(x-1) basically, at that point the same thing happens again; a new scope is created and the method recurs.

share|improve this answer

See Recursion is a method call in which same method calls itself.
So as in your code:

 public static void f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0)
        {
            System.out.println(x);
            f(x-1);    //at this point it will call itself as f(2)
            System.out.println(x);
            f(x-1);
        }
        System.out.println("bert");
    }

It will keep on calling itself until the if condition is true. The very main thing you need to understand is the Stack situation of method calls whether it is recursive or not.

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private String returnType(int t, String[] s) <- return type recursion example
{
    String arrayed = s[t];
    if (t == 0) // <--if 0
        return " " + arrayed;
    else
        return arrayed + returnType(t - 1, s); <--if != 0 return value and then call itself again with the value -1.
}

It returns arrayed when it reaches 0. This goes through String[] s, and puts all the strings together side by side into one string

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