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This is my code:

import random
minimum=int(input("Enter minimal value: "))
maximum=int(input("Enter maximum value: "))
howMany = int(input("How many numbers do you want to generate?"))
sum=0
n=1
while n<=howMany:
    num=random.randrange(minimum,maximum)
    num+=sum
    num+=1
    print(num)
print("Python's random average between", minimum, "and", maximum, "is", sum/howMany*100)

The problem is that when the user enters the amount of numbers they want generated, it doesnt say anything and python doesnt do anything. It just freezes. What is wrong with my code? Also, how would I calculate the average? I am getting 0.0 as the average.

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6  
num+=1 should be n+=1 –  BartoszKP Dec 10 '13 at 18:28
3  
It is much easier to use for _ in range(howMany):, then you can't forget to increment –  jonrsharpe Dec 10 '13 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

May I recommend using the for .. in loop to avoid these types of logical errors?

import random
minimum=int(input("Enter minimal value: "))
maximum=int(input("Enter maximum value: "))
howMany = int(input("How many numbers do you want to generate?"))
total=0
for n in range(howMany):
    num=random.randrange(minimum,maximum)
    total+=num
    print(num)
print("Python's random average between", minimum, "and", maximum, "is", total/howMany*100)

Indeed, it drives me nuts when I have to use a regular for loop in other languages.

Also note that it should be sum+=num, not num+=sum. a += b is the same as a = a + b - it's the left-hand-side that gets modified.

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How about total instead - so the builtin sum isn't shadowed for surprises later on... –  Jon Clements Dec 10 '13 at 18:33
    
If the OP's using 3, there's no xrange. –  DSM Dec 10 '13 at 18:38
    
good comments, both. updated –  Claudiu Dec 10 '13 at 20:04

Increment n instead of num and sum should be incremented by the value of num

while n<=howMany:
    num=random.randrange(minimum,maximum)
    sum += num 
    n += 1
    print(num)

Also to find the average use sum/howMany instead of sum/howMany*100

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I suggest using the built-in sum function, on a generator expression, rather than adding up your random values manually. This is a bit more advanced than what you're using, but it's one of the things that Python is really good at:

import random

minimum=int(input("Enter minimal value: "))
maximum=int(input("Enter maximum value: "))
howMany = int(input("How many numbers do you want to generate?"))

total = sum(random.randint(minimum, maximum) for _ in range(howMany)) # do the sum

avg = total / howMany # compute the average

# print the output
print("Average of {} random numbers between {} and {} is {:.2}".format(howMany, minimum,
                                                                       maximum, avg))

I'm doing a few other things differently too. To start with, I use the name total for the sum of the random numbers, so as not to shadow the built in sum function. Shadowing an existing name is allowed, but usually a bad idea (it can lead to bugs). Since I'm using the sum function, it would be very confusing to use sum as a variable name too.

In the generator expression inside the sum call, I'm also using randint rather than randrange, because it includes the maximum value (randrange excludes the maximum, like range does). I think this better matches the description of "between minimum and maximum", which suggests (to me at least) the endpoints should be handled symmetrically. If you are using your random numbers for some other purpose, you should be careful that the function you call matches your use, or you can get hard to find bugs.

I also use string formatting to produce the output, rather than passing multiple values to print. This allows a lot more flexibility in formatting, if you want it. I use that flexibility to limit the average to two decimal places, rather than Python's default (which is often all the precision available in the floating point number, about 16 decimal places).

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If speed is a concern. you could do:

import numpy as np
total = np.random.random_integers(minimum, maximum, size=(howMany)).sum()

which is roughly 100 times faster than

total = sum(random.randint(minimum, maximum) for _ in range(howMany))
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Here neither n nor howMany is being updated inside the loop and so the condition always remains true giving an infinite loop.

Update either n or reduce howMany value.

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