Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have code like this:

try:
            var = request.POST['var']                                        
except NameError:                
            var = ''

Why always code after "except" is executing? Even if request.POST['var'] exist.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

How do you know it is executing? Perhaps request.POST['var'] is also '' so you couldn't tell the difference.

Also, the only way that

var = request.POST['var'] 

could raise a NameError is if request doesn't exist.

If request.POST doesn't exist, means POST doesn't exist as an attribute of request thus raising AttributeError instead, and if request.POST['var'] doesn't exist, means 'var' is not a key of request.POST thus raising KeyError instead.


EDIT:

My guess is that you're not sending a POST. But can't know for sure.

share|improve this answer
    
'var' is definately not epmty - I see it in firebug. When I'm using AtrributeError instead of Name error i see message "Key 'var' not found in <QueryDict: {}>" –  DJPython Jan 12 '10 at 17:04
1  
huh, that means there's no 'var' in request.POST - firebug is not python* , it can't show python memory, python object contents, or anything on the script running on the server, since firebug runs on the browser. You're wrong about your assumption. –  nosklo Jan 12 '10 at 23:57
    
you are mixing up the two 'var's - the 'var' in the stack frame might exist. But it certainly doesn't exist as a key in your POST! that's what the error message is telling you. –  Sanjay Manohar Jan 13 '10 at 11:44

Eliminate the guesswork and replace NameError with something like KeyboardInterrupt, look at the traceback and you'll know exactly what the problem is.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the best way to find the cause of the problem. try/except blocks are useful, but they can also hide problems that you want to find. Take it out of the equation first. Then, after you've solved the problem, put it back in. –  jcdyer Jan 12 '10 at 20:28

A better way to do what you seem to be trying to do might be

var = request.POST.get('var', 'some default value')

where the second argument to the POST dict's get method is the value to return if the key ('var' in this case) doesn't exist. Translating your example exactly would result in:

var = request.POST.get('var', '')

That way, no try...except block or conditional statements are needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Won't help if request is undefined which seems to be the case here. –  Noufal Ibrahim Jan 12 '10 at 16:57

what's the result of the following in your case?

except NameError, e:
    print e
share|improve this answer

try

try:
            if request.method == 'POST':
               var = request.POST['var']                                        
except NameError:                
               var = ''
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.